Remembering 9/11

This post was first published in 2011 – the tenth anniversary of the dreaded day. Since then, I have made some changes. We’ve come a long way. Sadly, we’re all a little less trusting and a whole lot more wary. Is this a good thing? Sadly, whether it is or it isn’t, it’s a necessity in today’s world.

If you’re reading this in email or on Facebook, click on the title! It will take you directly to the blog (an easier viewing page.) If you’re already in my blog, WELCOME! (One more hint: If you click on any of the photos in the blog, they should open up in a browser window so you can get a better look!)

I’m sure there isn’t a soul reading this who doesn’t remember exactly where they were and what they were doing September 11, 2001 when the news came out about the cowardly, terrorist attacks against us all.

I was still living in the Atlanta metro area. I was working in “corporate America” and was just pulling into the parking garage at work. I rushed into the office and everyone was buzzing. We were all completely freaked out. Our office manager was running between our four floors trying to keep everyone calm. Senior management finally decided that our proximity to the Centers for Disease Control was too large a risk, so they sent us all home. No one knew when, if, or where another attack would be.

However, there was a whole lot of good that day (and many succeeding days) to remember. I remember people displaying the American flag everywhere. People actually looked out for one-another. There was a sense of great community and shared compassion. I read a great article on Fox News’ website. I’d like to share it with you. I hope when you click this link you will be able to open it. If not, please cut and paste it in your browser. It’s wonderful! I couldn’t say it any better.

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2011/09/06/blind-man-his-guide-dog-and-lessons-learned-on-11/

Hero Dog - Roselle

Hero Dog – Roselle

Another story about Roselle (the dog who saved her owner) is here. By the way, she was voted the “hero dog” by the public voting in the American Humane Society site.

http://www.today.com/id/44615382/ns/today-today_pets/t/dog-who-saved-owner-named-american-hero-dog/#.VBDgFmrD_VI

One vivid memory I have of the good will everyone had toward each other was how differently people drove that day. Instead of people driving like maniacs (which, trust me, is the norm in Atlanta) everyone was very careful and indulgent of each other. There was no general panic, just a sense that we were all in a very difficult boat and we needed to row together to accomplish anything. That spirit of cooperation seemed to last for many, many days after the initial attack.

Do you have memories to share of the spirit of togetherness and shared experience on 9/11 or thereafter? I’d love to hear about it. I’m sure we all would prefer to remember the good that came about from the attacks, rather than the fear and disgust.

Never Forget

Remembering

If you’re reading this in email or on Facebook, click on the title! It will take you directly to the blog (an easier viewing page.) If you’re already in my blog, WELCOME! (One more hint: If you click on any of the photos in the blog, they should open up in a browser window so you can get a better look!)

 

Heretofore, I have studiously avoided any topic in my blog which might be construed as controversial. I like my blog to be like the movies I enjoy – entertaining, and, sometimes, a little educational. However, I am going to make an exception today.

(Photo from web)

Today is the 11th anniversary of the blatant attacks on all of us by members of Al Qaeda. Don’t think for one moment that these attacks were just on New York City or Washington, DC. They were the targets because that’s where the planes were going and those were symbols of America and Americans. Those attacks were targeted on all of us – every last one of us. The color of our skin, our politics, what schools we did or didn’t attend, even our religious beliefs made no difference. The reason for the attacks – we’re Americans.

 

This day will reside in our collective memories. Those of us who were alive when President Kennedy was assassinated vividly remember where we were and what we were doing. (I was a child in elementary school.) There are other memories that will never subside – the Oklahoma City bombing, the Challenger explosion – but those all were either individual attacks (a president, an institution) or a terrible accident. The attacks on September 11 were choreographed attacks on the entire of the United States of America.

 

No, I’m not doing my normal blog because I’m angry. I’m still very angry. I’m angry because we Americans are vulnerable. That’s something I’ve known ever since I was a VERY small child. I grew up in St. Petersburg, Florida. At the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis, MacDill Air Force Base was the home of the United States Strike Command. We all knew – even as very small children – that MacDill would likely be one of the first targets should Cuba use their missiles. We learned “duck and cover” in daily drills. We also ‘knew’ in our hearts that if we ever heard the sirens – other than during a drill – we were all dead as were our parents, pets, friends…

 

I learned then what it was like to be vulnerable. Over the many ensuing years, I hadn’t forgotten how frightening that feeling was, but it wasn’t top of mind. That was until driving into work on September 11, 2001. All of the sudden, the fact that we are all targets was shoved in our faces once again.

Iconic Photo from World Trade Center
(from web)

However, there was some good to come out of the aftermath of the devastation and destruction. For a few precious weeks and months, we Americans were drawn together more than we had been any time since, probably, Pearl Harbor. We were all a little kinder – a little quieter. We listened to each other. We supported each other. We accepted our differences and worked together to get through our shared sorrow.

 

Somewhere in the past eleven years, we’ve lost a lot of that unity. No, we will never all agree on politics, religion, a myriad of other tenants we all hold personally dear. We don’t have to. We are AMERICANS! We are free to think and speak as we believe.

 

We should NEVER FORGET, however, that we must cherish our freedoms, our countrymen, and our nation. The moment we let go of those ideals, the terrorists in those planes win. Like the heroic men and women on Flight 93 who died to keep the third plane from attacking us all, we must be vigilant of those who would destroy us – whether they come from outside or within.

 

We must NEVER FORGET that WE are the United States of America. If one of us is attacked, we all are attacked.

 

WE must NEVER FORGET that WE are America.

God Bless America, and God Bless Us All!

 

 

 

 

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Looking forward to “seeing” you here on Colmel’s Blog!

Remembering 9-11

If you’re reading this in email or on Facebook, click on the title! It will take you directly to the blog (an easier viewing page.) If you’re already in my blog, WELCOME! (One more hint: If you click on any of the photos in the blog, they should open up in a browser window so you can get a better look!)

I’m sure there isn’t a soul reading this who doesn’t remember exactly where they were and what they were doing September 11, 2001 when the news came out about the cowardly, terrorist attacks against us all. There will be television programs, newspaper, and magazine articles (ad nauseum) to remind us all of the horrors of that day. We will be inundated, once again, with those images and harrowing stories of disaster.

However, there was a whole lot of good that day (and many succeeding days) to remember. I remember people displaying the American flag everywhere. People actually looked out for one-another. There was a sense of great community and shared compassion. I read a great article on Fox News’ website. I’d like to share it with you. I hope when you click this link you will be able to open it. If not, please cut and paste it in your browser. It’s wonderful! I couldn’t say it any better.

http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2011/09/06/blind-man-his-guide-dog-and-lessons-learned-on-11/

One vivid memory I have of the good will everyone had toward each other was how differently people drove that day. We lived in the Atlanta area, and there was great fear that the CDC (Centers for Disease Control) would be a target. Most companies allowed their employees to go home to their families (and to get out of town). Instead of people driving like maniacs (which, trust me, is the norm in Atlanta) everyone was very careful and indulgent of each other. There was no general panic, just a sense that we were all in a very difficult boat and we needed to row together to accomplish anything. That spirit of cooperation seemed to last for many, many days after the initial attack.

Do you have memories to share of the spirit of togetherness and shared experience on 9/11 or thereafter? I’d love to hear about it. I’m sure we all would prefer to remember the good that came about from the attacks, rather than the fear and disgust.

Up Next: Hello Dolly

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