Old Friends at Old Friends – A Visit to Great-Grandpa’s Grave

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Great-Grandpa is buried at Old Friends? Yes. Our very first mare’s name was Permanent Cut. (If you’ve been reading my blog, you’ll undoubtedly recognize the name.) She was bred by Dan Lasater in Florida. Her sire (dad) was a son of the great European champion, Ribot. Her dam (mom) was by the very good Nasrullah son, Jaipur. Even more interesting was that her grand-dam (grandmother) was by the great son of Nasrullah, Noor. Noor is buried at Old Friends.

Noor (Stallion photo)

Noor
(Stallion photo)

Here’s Permanent Cut’s pedigree

PERMANENT CUT (USA) b. F, 1981 {16} DP = 7-4-7-0-4 (22) DI = 1.93   CD = 0.45

  Permian (USA) 1971 Ribot (GB) 1952 Tenerani (ITY) 1944
 
  Romanella (ITY) 1943
 
  Pontivy (USA) 1959 Battlefield (USA) 1948
 
  Mahari (USA) 1954
Permanent Cut
(USA) 1981 Jaidan (USA) 1969 Jaipur (USA) 1959 Nasrullah (GB) 1940
 
  Rare Perfume (USA) 1947
 
  Dawn Fleet (USA) 1953 Noor (GB) 1945
 
  Monsoon (USA) 1942
 
Permanent Cut in 1989

Permanent Cut in 1989

 

Permanent Cut Noor's Great Granddaughter

Permanent Cut
Noor’s Great Granddaughter

Noor was born in 1945 in Ireland. The black son of Nasrullah was bred by the Aga Khan III. He was first raced by his breeder but purchased as a two-year-old by Charles S. Howard. If the name Howard rings a bell, you probably either read the story of Seabiscuit or saw the movie. While Noor won on the turf in Britain, he excelled on the dirt in the U.S.A.

Noor (Photo from Charlotte Farmer)

Noor
(Photo from Charlotte Farmer)

Even those who don’t follow horse racing closely probably recognize the name “Citation.” Citation was one of Calumet Farms’ triple-crown winners from the 1940s. He also had the longest unbeaten (16 straight) streak in thoroughbred racing for almost 50 years. He could beat almost every horse on any track – that was until he met Noor.

Noor's 1950 Hollywood Gold Cup (photos from "Noor: In Memory of a Champion" Facebook Page

Noor’s 1950 Hollywood Gold Cup
(photos from “Noor: In Memory of a Champion” Facebook Page

Noor (whose regular jockey was the famous Johnny Longden) defeated Citation four times, in the Santa Anita Handicap at 1¼ miles, the San Juan Capistrano Handicap at 1¾ miles in world record time, the Forty Niners Handicap at 1⅛ miles in track record time, and the Golden Gate Handicap. In the latter event, Noor conceded weight to Citation and set a world record of 1:58 which stood as an American record on a dirt track until Spectacular Bid broke it 30 years later. Citation’s times in these races would have also been records, but Noor ran faster than any horse in history up to that point.

Noor & Johnny Longden American Handicap

Noor & Johnny Longden
American Handicap

Noor - Johnny Longden up (Photo from Devora Berliner, creator of Noor Facebook page)

Noor – Johnny Longden up
(Photo from Devora Berliner, creator of Noor Facebook page)

On his way to being named 1950 U.S. Champion Handicap Male Horse, Noor beat not only Citation, but he also beat Horse of the Year Hill Prince, Derby winner Ponder, and twice overtook another Triple Crown winner, Assault. This made Noor the only horse in American racing history to defeat two Triple Crown winners. Sadly, Charles Howard died in June of 1950 and never saw his horse crowned champion.

Noor Battles Citation 1950 San Juan Capistrano)

Noor Battles Citation
1950 San Juan Capistrano)

 

Noor Wins By A Nose (1950 San Juan Capistrano)

Noor Wins By A Nose
(1950 San Juan Capistrano)

After his championship year, Noor was retired to the breeding shed. He first went to Kentucky (where he sired our mare’s grand-dam, Dawn Fleet, who was born in 1953 – the same year as I). He sired 13 stakes winners, but Dawn Fleet went on to become a very important mare and she and her dam, Monsoon, went on to be foundation mares for many, many stakes winners (not including my dear old Permanent Cut) and can be seen in the pedigrees of many top horses.

Noor on His Way to Kentucky with Trainer Burley Parke

Noor on His Way to Kentucky
with Trainer Burley Parke

Noor Arrives in Kentucky

Noor Arrives in Kentucky

Noor (What a Beautiful Head!)

Noor
(What a Beautiful Head!)

After 1954, Noor returned to the sight of his greatest achievements, California.

Noor with Trainer Burley Parke

Noor with Trainer Burley Parke

Noor was an imposing individual with terrific balance. He was very tall – over 17 hands (one hand equals 4 inches) at the withers. He was very much the same size as the amazing Zenyatta Unlike his sire, Noor was known to have a very pleasant disposition until the age of 29 when he developed equine dementia. Even Zenyatta’s trainer, John Shirreffs, became a fan of Noor. As a very young man, Shirreffs would tack a 19-year-old Noor up during the winter and ride him around the back arena at Loma Rica Ranch.

Noor Obituary (Photo from Horseandman)

Noor Obituary
(Photo from Horseandman)

He lived at Loma Rica until his death in 1974. Upon his death, Noor was buried in an unmarked grave (which was common in that era) the infield of the half-mile training track at Loma Rica. He was gone and almost forgotten by many. In 1999, however, Blood-Horse Magazine released their list of the 100 top champion thoroughbred racehorses of the 20th Century. Noor was listed at number 69. Then, in 2002 (any far later than one would think), Noor was inducted into the Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame at Saratoga in New York.

 

That was not to be the end of his story. Loma Rica Ranch was sold and a business park and residential development were planned for the land. That is when racing enthusiast, Charlotte Farmer, got involved. Not willing to see the beautiful champion remain buried under what would become a parking lot, Ms. Farmer went to work and got the wheels in motion to have Noor disinterred and brought to Old Friends in Georgetown, Kentucky. 

Charlotte Farmer (Noor's Greatest Fan)

Charlotte Farmer
(Noor’s Greatest Fan)

In March of 2010, using ground penetrating radar, Noor’s remains were located. On August 26, 2011, the bones of the great racehorse were very carefully exhumed from the earth and reverently placed in a wooden coffin. The long trek across country began. On August 31, 2011, Noor was buried with a fitting funeral/memorial at Old Friends. Ms. Farmer completed her mission of love by attending the service and seeing that Noor had a fitting headstone. I’d like to take this moment to, personally, thank Ms. Farmer for her dedication to making sure that Noor finally got the respect and resting place he so richly deserves.

 

Great Grandpa's Grave (the Amazing Noor at Rest at Old Friends)

Great Grandpa’s Grave
(the Amazing Noor at Rest at Old Friends)

This past summer (almost exactly two years later), I finally got to pay my respects to a grand champion and the great-grandpa of my beloved mare. I couldn’t help but shed tears for Noor and for my old girl. I wish I’d known Noor. He embodied all the things in a horse I’d grown up loving. He was big, black, could run like the wind, and – by most accounts – had a very pleasant personality for a stallion. He was, in all ways, a Champion.

Noor's Headstone (With Utmost Thanks to Ms. Charlotte Famer)

Noor’s Headstone
(With Utmost Thanks to Ms. Charlotte Famer)

This is the final post in my current series on Old Friends. I want to particularly thank Lorraine Jackson for her article on Noor, and Devora Berliner, creator of the Noor Facebook webpage “Noor: In Memory of a Champion.” I want to send special thanks to the amazing Charlotte Farmer for sharing her photos and research, and for her fortitude and persistence in not allowing this magnificent horse to be forgotten. As always, a huge “thank you” goes to all the wonderful people at Old Friends for finding a special burial plot where many can come to pay their respects and learn about this worthy champion.

Noor's Headstone (epitaph by Ms. Charlotte Famer)

Noor’s Headstone
(epitaph by Ms. Charlotte Famer)

Remember, it takes a great deal of money to support all the horses at Old Friends. They give the horses the kind of life they so richly deserve. Old Friends gratefully accepts donations (which are tax-deductible) and has some terrific items for purchase (some on Ebay). All of the profits go to help the horses. Please check out their website ” (www.oldfriendsequine.org ) and see if you, too, might want to be one who helps Old Friends and their tremendous mission.

 

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Old Friends at Old Friends – The MOST Anticipated Visit

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This is the next-to-last installment about our visit this past summer to “Old Friends – A Kentucky Facility for Retired Thoroughbreds” (www.oldfriendsequine.org ).

 

Those of you who have been following my blog for a while know that we were in the thoroughbred breeding and racing business for a few years. That business brought me some of the highest highs and the lowest lows in my life. Helping with the birth of a foal, getting her through serious illness, and then into the winner’s circle is one of the greatest achievements in my life.

 

Our first mare was Permanent Cut. You’ve heard about her before, and you will again in this and the next post. P.C. was a half-sister to Cut Away, who ran third in the 1982 Preakness. P.C. was a grand-daughter of the great Ribot and her female family was (and still is) one of the top-producing female lines in the country. She was an easy-going girl who I loved, dearly. I hated to part with her; but, unfortunately, the horse business can be very difficult. After some serious financial and emotional set-backs (including losing our first foal – who we had foaled, raised and raced – to colic), it became clear to us that we needed to sell our horses and leave the business. It was a heart-wrenching decision, but a necessary one.

 

Luckily, we had kept our mares with a terrific horseman in Kentucky. He understood our plight and agreed with us that the thoroughbred business had become a losing proposition for us. He helped us find an excellent home for our girls – Permanent Cut and her yearling filly. I was very happy that the new owner kept us apprised of what was going on with the girls. Imagine my joy when I found out that he bred Permanent Cut to a son of Secretariat named Tinners Way.

Tinners Way (photo from Sporthorse)

Tinners Way
(photo from Sporthorse)

Tinners Way had become a favorite of mine the very first time I saw him. I quickly recognized him as being very much like his sire in looks. Secretariat had several sons who had his brilliant chestnut coloring, but most of his sons and daughters that I had met had looked more like their dams (e.g., Lady’s Secret – the brilliant race mare – was gray, Risen Star was virtually black). I had also met Academy Award (better known as “Oscar” – a past/passed Old Friends alum) when Permanent Cut was bred to him at Claiborne farm. “Oscar” had Big Red’s coloring, but he was a slighter/smaller version. Tinners is more like his sire in stature, and – as you can see from photos – in his markings.

Tinners Way (photo from Pintrest)

Tinners Way
(photo from Pintrest)

Tinners Way was a foal of 1990. His sire, and arguably the best horse to ever look through a bridle, had passed away in the previous fall. Tinners was a late foal. Thoroughbred horses become “yearlings” the January 1st following their birthday, no matter what month they happen to be born in. Since Tinners was born in late May (the 25th), he would have been at a great disadvantage racing in the Triple Crown races. His owners/breeders, Juddmonte Farms, instead sent the colt to Europe.

Tinners Way

Tinners Way

In Europe, Tinners only had one start as a 2-year-old. That was a win on the turf. He had four more races in Europe which were all stakes races and in which he won two and came in third in the others. After that, he came to the United States where he ended up in the care of the amazing, Bobby Frankel. Tinners Way won the Pacific Classic (Grade 1) at Del Mar in 1994. In 1995, he won the Pacific Class yet again. Another stand-out race for him in 1995 was a second in a graded stakes race to the great Cigar. His last Grade 1 win was in the Californian at Hollywood Park in 1996. Unfortunately, in his attempt to win back-to-back-to-back runnings of the Pacific Classic, Tinners Way was injured. He was retired to stud.

Tinners Way (photo from maggiemae)

Tinners Way
(photo from maggiemae)

I had been looking forward to meeting Tinners Way since the moment he went to stud in Kentucky. However, that was at the time that we were getting out of the horse business, and my heart just wasn’t in seeing reminders that we were no longer breeding and racing horses. I always hoped, however, that one day I would meet this son of Secretariat that looked so much like his sire. As you will see in an upcoming post, I had been lucky enough to get to know the great, red horse and had visited with him several times. I’d met several of Secretariat’s sons and daughters, but had only found his “spark” sizzling in Lady’s Secret. I wondered if Tinners Way had gotten any of that undefinable quality. I really hoped he had.

Tinner

Tinners Way – SO Handsome

Tinner and Me

Tinner and Me

On August 23 I got the best birthday present ever. I got to spend time at Old Friends with the wonderful people and horses. I had told them about my desire to see Tinners Way (he wasn’t on the regular tour at the time). The staff gave us permission and told us where to find him. It wasn’t far, but there had been so much rain that the way was excessively muddy. I wasn’t to be dissuaded. They also told me that Tinners could be a bit stand-offish. They warned me not to be disappointed if he stood up in the corner of his paddock and didn’t come down to visit. I told them I understood, but still wanted to at least see him from a distance.

My Chat with Tinners Way

My Chat with Tinners Way

They shouldn’t have worried. I called out to Tinners when we were walking up to his paddock. He lifted his head, turned, and started trotting down to the fence. He was wearing a fly mask, but I could see through it that he was, indeed, his father’s son. There was a look of welcome there. Certainly, a large part of his welcome was for someone bringing carrots, but I really felt as though he could tell that I was someone who appreciated him. I immediately got tears in my eyes because his gentleness and self-awareness was much like the way his sire was with me, years ago. He doesn’t have the amazing “presence” Secretariat had – doubt another will – but he did have a calm acceptance that was endearing. I could have stayed there at the fence and talked to him all day. Unfortunately, time to head home came much too soon. I made a promise to myself that I would be back for another visit before too long.

 

Why, Yes, I believe I WILL have a carrot

Why, Yes, I believe I WILL have a carrot

 

One Share in Tinners Way

One Share in Tinners Way

We went back up to the Old Friends office where I immediately bought a “share” in Tinners Way. A share is a $100 donation that helps Old Friends pay for the marvelous upkeep of their horses. Shares are available for all of Old Friends’ wonderful equine guests. I had purchased a share in Bonnie’s Poker a few years back, and intend to make it a yearly donation for Tinners Way. It’s a tangible way to be involved with the horses. Old Friends later sent me a beautiful certificate and photo along with his information page. I also saw that Old Friends had bracelets made from the manes of several of their horses available for purchase. I asked that they call or email me when they had one made from Tinners Way’s mane. I am proud to say that I now have two bracelets.

You Aren't Leaving Are You?

You ARE Going to Give Me That Carrot, Right?

Let me emphasize, again, what an amazing job everyone at Old Friends does. From their beginnings with only a few stallions, Old Friends has grown into the best place on the planet for horses to go when they retire from either the breeding shed (in the case of stallions and mares) or the racetrack (in the case of the geldings). It takes a great deal of money to support all these horses and give them the kind of life they so richly deserve. Old Friends gratefully accepts donations (and they are a tax-deductible charity) and has some terrific items for purchase (some on Ebay) which all go to help the horses. Please check out their website  (www.oldfriendsequine.org ) and see if you, too, might want to be one who helps Old Friends and their tremendous mission.

 

Up Next: Old Friends at Old Friends – A Visit to Great-Grandpa’s Grave

 

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Old Friends at Old Friends – The Superstars

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In the last post, I talked about some of the wonderful horses (the “Grand Geldings”) I got to be reacquainted with at “Old Friends – A Kentucky Facility for Retired Thoroughbreds” (www.oldfriendsequine.org ).

 

I’m grouping these two horses together – the superstars – because they both had amazing records, have legions of fans, and have been together for quite a long time.

 

Creator and Sunshine Forever. Sunshine Forever and Creator. Either way you say it, they belong together. They were the first two stallions to ever be returned from Japan to the U.S. for retirement. 

Creator A European Superstar

Creator
A European Superstar

Creator was foaled on June 1, 1986 in England. He was purchased and raced by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al Maktoum, a member of the ruling family in Dubai. One of the final foals by the great Mill Reef, he did not disappoint. Creator raced primarily in Europe – England and France, but his last race was in the United States where he finished third in the Budweiser International.

 

Creator Welcomes His Guests

Creator Welcomes His Guests

In Europe, he was a bona fide star at ages 3 and 4. He raced on both dirt and turf, winning seven times and bankrolling over $500,000. His greatest wins were Group 1 and 2 races including, the Prix Ganay (G1) (which his sire also won), the Prix d’Ispahan (G1), the Prix d’Harcourt (G2), and the Ciga Prix Dollar (G2).

Creator Reading for a Carrot

Creator
Reaching for a Carrot

While Creator was best known for racing in Europe, his stud career took him to Japan where he and Sunshine Forever stood at Nitta Farm. He has become quite a favorite at Old Friends where his regal presence makes you forget that you are looking at a 25-year-old (now 26) stallion.

 

Creator Holds Court

Creator Holds Court

As you can see from the photos, he’s a magnificent-looking individual. He is one of those bright, coppery red horses with a white star that seems to “dribble” a little down his nose. Except for the bit of white in his face, he looks like a much younger horse. You’d better believe he “knows” that he’s still a beauty, too. He carries himself in a regal way and has an amazingly intelligent eye. He still has “presence.” He’s still a horse that commands respect.

 

Sunshine Forever Forever in My Heart

Sunshine Forever
Forever in My Heart

I absolutely adored Sunshine Forever. As I write this, I still can’t bring myself to believe he is gone. I’m so glad I got to see him in August. He was hale and hearty then. If you are a long-time reader of my blog, you might remember me talking about Sunshine Forever in an earlier post. He was a favorite of my “mentor” and dear friend, Mark Yother. I initially went to see him at Old Friends as a sort of homage to my late friend. I ended up appreciating him for his wonderful personality and great story.

Sunshine 4

Sunshine Forever was foaled March 14, 1985 at Darby Dan Farm. This dark bay colt with the irregular white blaze was absolutely bred to do great things on the turf. A son John Galbreath’s great Roberto out of the Graustark mare, Outward Sunshine, Sunshine Forever was a prince in-waiting from the day he was born.

 

Sunshine & Me

Sunshine & Me

The Eclipse Awards got it right when they awarded Sunshine Forever the 1988 Turf Championship. He amassed over $2-million in earnings while winning or placing in eleven graded stakes races. Among those were wins in the Grade 1, Man O’War Stakes, the Grade 1 Turf Classic, and the Grade 1 Budweiser International. My very first Breeders Cup was in 1988 at Churchill Downs. I was screaming and virtually riding Sunshine Forever in the B.C. Turf. He ran well, but was narrowly defeated by Great Communicator. That was the same year that Old Friends’ resident Gulch won the B.C. Sprint and Personal Ensign capped off her undefeated career in one of the most amazing races of all time in the B.C. Distaff.

 

Sunshine Forever Greeting the Group

Sunshine Forever
Greeting the Group

Sunshine Forever went to stud and, eventually, lived at Nikka Stud in Japan. In 2004, Sunshine returned home to the US. This was a completely unique situation. Not only was Sunshine the very first horse to be returned to the United States for his retirement, but this amazing animal was also to become the very first stallion to a new concept in the bluegrass. The concept was called “Old Friends – A Kentucky Facility for Retired Thoroughbreds.” Little did anyone involved with Old Friends at the time realize that within 10 short years Old Friends would have two locations (the original in Kentucky and Cabin Creek in New York), be home to over 100 retired racehorses, and be a “bucket list” destination for thousands of horse-lovers from around the world.

Sunshine Forever Saying Hello Again

Sunshine Forever
Saying Hello Again

The first time I met Sunshine “in person,” I marveled at how good he looked and what a supremely pleasant horse he was to be around – especially for a stallion. He showed no aggression at all, and seemed to thoroughly enjoy the attention he received from the visitors to Old Friends. It was almost as though he knew he was a champion and all the attention was simply his “due.”

Sunshine Forever Allowed Me to Pull His Tongue

Sunshine Forever
Allowed Me to Pull His Tongue

In August (2013), I got to visit him again. This time, he allowed me the supreme pleasure of pulling his tongue. He was in a very mellow mood – even for him. Everyone on the group got to take photos with him and he was perfectly content to stand by the fence and receive carrots and adoration from all of us. Not even once did he pin an ear or appear to be even the slightest bit annoyed by all of us fussing around him.

 

Ah, Sunshine, you were always a class act.

 

Up Next: Old Friends at Old Friends – The MOST Anticipated Visit

 

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What I Did on My Summer Vacation 2013 (Eagle’s Nest Mountain)

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Eagle’s Nest Mountain is beautiful. The views are spectacular.

One View From Eagle's Nest Mountain

One View From Eagle’s Nest Mountain

In 1900, S. C. Satterthwait built the Eagle Nest Hotel at an elevation of 5050 feet. The hotel was one of the two hay fever resorts in western North Carolina, and it had room for 100 guests (although tents could be used if the hotel filled up) and a view of Plott Balsam. “[A] good wagon road” reached the top of the mountain.

 

Today, Eagle’s Nest Mountain Road winds up the mountain, following much the same trail as the “wagon road” of yesteryear. It’s still a twisting, turning road that must be respected. If you read my story about having to snake our way up with police cars guarding front and back (https://colmel.wordpress.com/2011/10/27/a-truely-scary-story ), you know I have a healthy respect for that barely, two-lane byway.

 

Our home on Eagle’s Nest Mountain was a Lindal Cedar Home. It was built at an elevation of 5,150 ft. – not very far from the former location of the hotel. I have been desperately looking to see if I can find some of the photos of our home, but haven’t had any luck. Of course, this is one of my favorite topics, so I’ll (undoubtedly) revisit it soon.

 

There are many legends that involve Eagle’s Nest Mountain. One of the most persistent is that of Boojum. I told the story – as I’d always heard it – in an earlier post (https://colmel.wordpress.com/2011/09/12/another-appalachian-tale-%e2%80%93-boojum-the-mystery-on-eagle%e2%80%99s-nest-mountain/ ). I recently read a post from another blogger who had learned a slightly different story http://ashevilleoralhistoryproject.com/2012/11/02/boojum/

 

In his story, Boojum’s bride could be responsible for the burning of the grand hotel.

 

There have always been tales of strange things happening on Eagle’s Nest. There was a large outcropping of rocks known as “Boy Scout Rock.” Scouts used to regularly hike up the mountain and camp in the area. Many of them told stories of seeing and hearing strange things. Some were so frightened that they only went on one trip. Others say that they neither saw nor heard anything other than the wind and the animals that naturally inhabit the mountain.

 

Other stories involve people feeling as though they are being followed, but turning to see no one there. Some have reported hearing “parties” in the large meadow near the top only to find it empty. There are wild animals on the mountain, so that might explain some of the things people have seen or heard. The stories go back over a century – probably even before the first, non-native Americans arrived.

 

Party Here?

Party Here?

 

During our relatively short time on the mountain, there were numerous odd things happen, but – other than one terrifying, inexplicable occurrence – nothing that made me worry. That, of course, was until our house burned to the ground. The destruction was so complete, that there never was a definitive cause. One more mystery to add to legends of Eagle’s Nest Mountain.

 

On our recent trip, I was pleased to find that there is, once again, a home on the ground that once held our home. It’s a lovely home and the owners have landscaped the second lot beautifully. I wish I’d stopped and given them my card so that they could call me if they ever wanted to sell. (That would require me to win some form of lottery, though, I’m sure.) Their view (our view) is spectacular! From our deck we could see Maggie Valley, the “smoke” from Ghost Town in the Sky, and – on a very clear day – all the way to Mount LeConte near Gatlinburg, Tennessee.

 

New Home Where Ours Used To Be

New Home Where Ours Used To Be

 

Beautiful Landscaping

Beautiful Landscaping

On the way back down, I snapped a couple of photos of the meadow where the old hotel stood so many years ago. It took all my self-restraint to not hop out of the car and go running in the tall, wet grass. Every time I go back up the mountain, I feel more at home and get a stronger sense of that this is where I belong.

 

The "Meadow"

The “Meadow”

 

The "Meadow"

The “Meadow”

 

 

 

The "Pond" (Boojum's Bath?)

The “Pond” (Boojum’s Bath?)

 

Up Next: What I Did on My Summer Vacation 2013 (The Andon-Reid Bed & Breakfast)

 

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What I Did on My Summer Vacation 2013 (Waynesville: A Journey “Home”)

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In my “Prologue” to this group of posts I wrote about Waynesville, North Carolina. As I read that post again, I realized I’d poured my heart into it and wouldn’t change a word. Here is that text again.

My aunt grew up in Waynesville, North Carolina. I had listened to her talk about her home town for so many years, I felt like I knew it, too. Years later, my parents were offered the opportunity to purchase land on Eagle’s Nest Mountain in Waynesville. A neighbor was involved in a partnership to development a portion of the mountain and offered my parents the chance to get in on the ground-floor at the pre-development prices. They jumped at the chance. I’ll never forget driving up Eagle’s Nest for the first time to choose our lots. I immediately fell in love with the mountain and knew I’d come “home.”

“Waynesville has, ever since, been a magical place for me. Even after our home on Eagle’s Nest burned to the ground in late 1980, Waynesville has held a very special place in my heart. Memories of spending happy times with family (immediate and extended) are part of the reason for this; however, there is just something about the town, and the people who live there, that makes me feel warm and welcome.

Beautiful Waynesville, NC (Eagles' Nest Mountain in the Background)

Beautiful Waynesville, NC
(Eagles’ Nest Mountain in the Background)

Waynesville is the county-seat of Haywood County. The courthouse is right on Main Street.

Haywood County Courthouse Waynesville, NC

Haywood County Courthouse
Waynesville, NC

Main Street has changed quite a lot since we had our home in Waynesville. Most of the storefronts are still the same, but the change is in what’s inside. I was afraid that I would find the loss of the stores I used to visit hard to accept. I was wrong. Main Street, now, has some beautiful stores with artisan-quality goods. There are galleries of all kinds. Some world-class artists now call Waynesville home. There are also restaurants, chocolate shops, and clothing stores. Several real estate agents have offices on Main, as well as several attorneys’ offices.

Banjo & Wash-tub Base Main Street @ Miller Waynesville, NC

Banjo & Wash-tub Base
Main Street @ Miller
Waynesville, NC

Main Street Waynesville, NC

Main Street
Waynesville, NC

Looking Down Main Street Waynesville, NC

Looking Down Main Street Waynesville, NC

Mast General Store (one of several in North Carolina) is also on Main. Mast has a little of everything – clothing, shoes, housewares, furnishings, food, and the largest selection of old-time candy found anywhere.

Mast General Store Main Street Waynesville, NC

Mast General Store
Main Street
Waynesville, NC

I think the biggest surprise for me was that there are now three active breweries in Waynesville! We visited Tipping Point Tavern, but there are also Headwaters Brewing and Frog’s Leap Public House. Those two we will check out on our next visit.

Tipping Point Tavern Waynesville, NC

Tipping Point Tavern
Waynesville, NC

Tipping Point Tavern was a fun place to visit. Their in-house brews are quite good. We tried both the “Hiking Viking” (my Northeast High School friends will certainly understand this) and the “Chunky Girl Amber.” They also have an IPA called “Punch in the Face IPA.” We found the brews quite hoppy, so we can imagine what the IPA must be. Next time…

We had both a lunch and a dinner at Tipping Point Tavern. Lunch was quite enjoyable. The food was quite good – can’t say “great” with regard to sandwiches and beer, but very good. We started with the beer-battered jalapeno poppers which were hot from the fryer and had very good flavor. I had the Tavern Reuben and really enjoyed it. Jim had Fish Tacos. I must say, you really shouldn’t be leaving Tipping Point hungry! They don’t skimp on portions!

Dinner was something of a different story. We had planned to go to The Bourbon Barrel, but they weren’t interested in seating us – even though there were many open tables. I guess that’s a place for locals only. Out-of-towners need not darken their doors. So… we ended up back at Tipping Point Tavern. Yes, the portions were huge (especially the Pulled Pork Burrito)! What was really off-putting was the noise level. We were there on a Wednesday night, so we didn’t expect the crush of people or the noise. Obviously, this is the place for the younger crowd to meet for drinks after work. If we’d been there just for a beer or cocktails (and had been several years younger), we probably would have had a wonderful time. For dinner, well it was rather hard to enjoy ourselves. If you go, it’s probably wise to stick to lunch, or go for their terrific beer and after-work party.

Now for the best meal of our entire trip. It was at The Sweet Onion restaurant on Miller Street. This restaurant would be at home in any large city in the U.S, but it’s nestled in beautiful, downtown Waynesville, NC.

Sweet Onion

Sweet Onion
Waynesville, NC

We had been told by the innkeepers at our bed & breakfast (Andon-Reid) – complete review in a dedicated post coming – that reservations were strongly suggested, so they made them for us. This lovely restaurant was bustling and after our experience, I understand why. The service was superb. We were warmly welcomed and shown to a comfortable table next to the window. Our server took our beverage order and gave us a couple of minutes to take-in the menu. What a menu! It was incredibly hard to decide.

We settled on splitting the crab cake appetizer. This was chock-full of lump crab loosely bound and served with a terrific lemon-basil aioli. Our entrees were amazing. Jim had the Blackberry BBQ Short Ribs. He proclaimed that they were the best he’d ever had. They were fall-off-the bone tender and the sauce was incredible. I had the Shrimp & Grits. Now, these are no ordinary shrimp and grits! The white cheddar grits were topped with huge, perfectly-cooked shrimp and big pieces of bacon. On top of all that lusciousness, there was a delicate, yet flavorful, lobster cream sauce. Heavenly! I even got one of my all-time favorite sides with this entrée. Marinated Cucumber and Tomato Salad is one of the food items I most closely associate with my Aunt Jean (who grew up in Waynesville). To have this on the menu, and on my plate, brought me nostalgically home with her.

Dessert wasn’t necessary; but, then again, we were on vacation. We decided to splurge on splitting an amazing crème brulee. It was absolutely perfect. It was creamy and soul-satisfying, yet light enough to leave us comfortable. All in all, one of the best meals either of us had ever had.

If you are going to be in Waynesville for any length of time, I highly recommend you make plans to have at least one dinner at Sweet Onion. You won’t be sorry.

 

Up Next: What I Did on My Summer Vacation 2013 (Eagle’s Nest Mountain)

 

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THAT Time of Year

If you’re reading this in email or on Facebook, click on the title! It will take you directly to the blog (an easier viewing page.) If you’re already in my blog, WELCOME! (One more hint: If you click on any of the photos in the blog, they should open up in a browser window so you can get a better look!)

The Great Zenyatta and her 2013 Colt Photo by Alys Emson/Lane’s End

The Great Zenyatta and her 2013 Colt
Photo by Alys Emson/Lane’s End

This is the time of year that I have always loved the most. Sure, I love seeing the world start to turn green again (at least in the Northern Hemisphere) after a long winter. This was a particularly cold and snowy winter. That’s not what I’m referring to, however. What really gets my juices going is that this is the time of year that the new baby thoroughbreds start arriving. It’s also the time of year when those lucky, very few who own superiorly-talented, 3-year-old thoroughbreds can almost see themselves holding the Kentucky Derby trophy. It is a season of hope. As the first Saturday in May gets closer and closer, dreams get bigger and bigger.

Churchill Downs Photo from kentuckytourism.com

Churchill Downs
Photo from kentuckytourism.com

I’ve been there. No, we certainly never owned a Kentucky Derby winner, but we have owned and bred thoroughbreds. I know the anticipation of every new baby. With every glance, you wonder, “Are you the one?” Numbers are certainly not in your favor – you realize this – as there are approximately 30,000 new thoroughbred foals born in the United States every year. The likelihood that one in your pasture will be the next Derby winner is even lessened in that excellent candidates are also born all around the world. With transportation today (something I also know a little about), a thoroughbred foaled anywhere can be entered in the Kentucky Derby as long as they are a bona-fide three-year-old. It doesn’t stop you from dreaming, though. The next “big” horse has to come from somewhere. Why not yours? Sure, the lions’ share of the eventual Derby winners come from older-line, established farms and families, but not all. If there’s one thing I learned in the horse business, it’s that there are no guarantees; well, other than that you will spend quite a lot of money and that it will bring you the highest of highs and the lowest of lows.

 

Let me tell you a little about our foray into the world of thoroughbreds.

Nashua - The Kentucky Horse

Nashua – The Kentucky Horse

Swaps - The California "Invader"

Of course, I was one of those horse-crazy little girls who never outgrew that “stage.” There are members of my family who will swear that I was vaccinated with the horse-racing bug when I was born in Kentucky. That may be true. Some of my earliest memories involve horses. When I was just a little baby, my parents put me into a basket on the back of a big, black horse. They’ve always said I couldn’t possibly remember that, but I do. I also remember trying to come up with names for contests run by a tobacco company in the 1950s to “name the thoroughbred and win it”. My dad dutifully wrote down the names I liked and sent them in. The first Derby winner that I have a memory of was Swaps. I was very, very little (almost 2), but my parents always watched the Derby. It seems surreal to me that I have any memory of that other than my parents being astounded that a “California horse” could beat the best from the Bluegrass. Years later, I actually got to “meet” Nashua, the horse that everyone expected to win. The next year was a big one for Florida (where I grew up)! Needles from Ocala won. Our first broodmare was actually purchased from one of Needles’ owners. I’m getting ahead of myself!

Needles - Winner of the 1956 Kentucky Derby Photo from: thevaulthorseracing.wordpress.com

Needles – Winner of the 1956 Kentucky Derby
Photo from: thevaulthorseracing.wordpress.com

All my childhood, I asked for horses for Christmas and birthdays. My dad wouldn’t relent because he said that the upkeep would be too expensive. I never understood, but bided my time and took riding lessons every week. Later in life, I owned an off-the-track thoroughbred many years after his racing career. That didn’t end well (he was badly injured in a freak pasture accident and had to be euthanized.) Perhaps I should have taken that as an omen, but I never stopped loving horses – especially the thoroughbred.

 

Our breeding and racing business started innocently enough. We had been to Kentucky on a vacation. During that time, we had visited Claiborne farm and I actually got to meet, rub, and generally fawn all over Secretariat. I’m going to have a post coming up solely about the great, big, red horse.

Secretariat at Claiborne Farm

Secretariat at Claiborne Farm

Not long after that, Jim had a coworker who owned thoroughbreds out west. He “said” he’d done okay breeding and racing them and that it was a lot of fun. In hindsight, it is almost funny to remember that he had a mare he wanted to sell. We lived in Georgia at the time. Georgia did not then, and still does not, have pari-mutuel racing. There are, however, some very beautiful horse farms there, and there was racing right over the border in Alabama.

Mark Yother - Dear Friend and Mentor

Mark Yother – Dear Friend and Mentor

We met a wonderful man who had a horse farm (thoroughbreds and appendix quarter horses). He had been around racing (both flat and steeplechase) for many years. We had determined that, if we were to own a mare, we would like to keep her with him. We trusted him to give us good care and, mostly, great advice. Mark Yother was the consummate gentleman and horseman. I’ve talked about Mark, at length, in a post I published this time last year.

 

Mark went with us to take a look at the mare that Jim’s coworker had for sale. We had already enlisted the services of a local equine veterinarian who told us that the mare was “clean,” and that she should be able to get in-foal (pregnant). He never mentioned anything out of the norm as far as the mare was concerned. Mark took a good look at her, walked her around a little, and came back to our truck. He told us she was dead lame. No wonder the fella wanted to sell her. She probably could have been able to carry a foal, but why buy a lame horse when there were horses to be purchased that had better bloodlines, already in-foal, and perfectly sound.

Keeneland Sales - Lexington, Kentucky Photo from Keeneland.com

Keeneland Sales – Lexington, Kentucky
Photo from Keeneland.com

That was the first, but certainly not the last, bit of great advice we got. In retrospect, it’s a wonder we continued on with the idea of getting into the thoroughbred business. We were thoroughly bitten by the bug. We immediately ordered catalogs for upcoming sales in Lexington. We really didn’t think our pocketbook would purchase a mare from those catalogs, but we wanted to start educating ourselves on the bloodlines we liked and learn how the sales work. In the late 1980s, many top farms were dispersing their breeding stock. We saw some of the most famous mares of the day go through the sales ring. It was at the breeding stock sales in Lexington that we saw the great Lady’s Secret (Secretariat’s gorgeous, amazing, gray daughter) and Sacahuista. We also determined that Kentucky was not going to be the place where we would be able to purchase an in-foal mare that fit the pedigree profile we had determined we were looking for in a price range that we could afford.

Lady's Secret Photo by the incomparable Barbara Livingston

Lady’s Secret
Photo by the incomparable Barbara Livingston

Up Next: Going to the Ocala Sales

 

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After the Storm

If you’re reading this in email or on Facebook, click on the title! It will take you directly to the blog (an easier viewing page.) If you’re already in my blog, WELCOME! (One more hint: If you click on any of the photos in the blog, they should open up in a browser window so you can get a better look!)

I was going to do my next blog on the topic of “Fall,” then Sandy came along. I’ve decided that I would talk a little about hurricanes. I know I tend to jump around a whole lot – no discernible major topic – but as I said on the tab “What This Blog is About,” my blog is the Seinfeld of blogs. It’s about whatever comes into my mind.

I guess I’m something of a “weather-wonk.” Meteorology has always fascinated me.

Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy had me very worried about New Jersey. I have a whole passel of kin who live in New Jersey. I spoke to my aunt and, thank God, all in her immediate family are okay. Some are without power, but all are well. All my family is originally from the Garden State (both sides). My father was born in New Jersey. My Aunt Viv – who I spoke to – is my late father’s, brother’s widow. (Got that?) My mother’s parents moved to Florida before she was born, but they and umpteen generations prior were from a very small area in New Jersey.

Seaside, New Jersey Roller Coaster
(courtesy LA Times)

The photo above is from the Jersey shore. My cousins and I went there when my family and I visited. A very sad site for me. 

Growing up in Florida, hurricanes were a part growing up. We didn’t actually have that many, but we were always prepared. I guess that’s why I was so astounded that so many people in Hurricane Sandy’s path decided to stay in low-lying areas. Did they not watch footage of the destruction caused by wind and water in Hurricane Andrew or Katrina? Sure both Andrew and Katrina were category 5 storms, but in my memory there have been so many really horrible hurricanes that I would have thought that people would take note and move themselves and their family and pets to safer locations. Did they just never pay attention before because the storm was somewhere else? Did they think that they’d never be touched? I guess now almost the entire country realizes that these storms can affect just about everyone.

Here in Michigan (where I now live), we even had some weather offshoot from Hurricane/Superstorm Sandy. We had 60+ mph gusts and sustained winds in the 40s. We didn’t get nearly as much rain as in the storm, proper, but we did get quite a bit. I know that virtually every state east of the Mississippi River had some ill weather caused by Sandy.

Below are some photos of the leaves that came down from the storm. In a strange way, Sandy helped with our fall clean-up. Usually, we are raking and blowing leaves for weeks and weeks. I would say that this year, it was accomplished in almost half the time.

Ankle-high leaves

Backyard Leaves
(Courtesy of Sandy)

One of the stories from Sandy that makes me very sad is that the HMS Bounty, her captain, and one crew member were lost. The Bounty was harbored in St. Petersburg’s Vinoy Basin for years. As a matter of fact, my junior-high school beau and his father were part of the crew who sailed her on her maiden voyage to St. Pete. I remember what a hoopla it was when she arrived. She became part of our city very easily. The fact that she is forever lost with her captain (also from St. Petersburg) and one of Fletcher Christian’s (the REAL Fletcher Christian from mutiny fame) multiple-great-granddaughters were lost makes the loss so much more difficult.

 

HMS Bounty as I remember her
(photo from Examiner.com)

Bounty after Hurricane Sandy
(photo from Christian Science Monitor)

These storms are not to be trifled with. Who can ever forget the story of the “Perfect Storm” of 1991 in which a Nor’easter intertwined with Hurricane Grace in which there was so much damage and the fishing vessel Andrea Gail were lost.

Damage in St. Pete/Tampa area
Hurricane Donna – 1960

My first hurricane memory was that of Hurricane Donna in 1960. Daddy had to tape and board up all the windows in the house. We had sliding-glass doors in the living room, so those took a lot of work. Our house was cement block with brick, so we knew that she wasn’t going anywhere, but – the windows – those were a different story. I tried to help as much as I could with the tape. Mostly, though, I was told to keep an eye on my baby brother. When the storm began to really scream, my parents took my brother into their room with them. My room had a high window that looked over the front entry porch. Our family car was in the garage, but my dad’s little Austin Healy Sprite wouldn’t fit in the garage with the big car. He had pulled it up onto the entry porch – which had cast iron supports along one side and the block and brick of the house along the other and the front. The back, however, was completely open. I remember listening to the transistor radio that my parents had given me while the commentators were driving around the area reporting on the storm. One of them went to the Gandy Bridge (which was – at the time – the major bridge between St. Petersburg and Tampa). He was reporting the bridge closed because waves were breaking over it. That really struck home then – as it does now – because that bridge is in Tampa Bay. The bay can get really choppy, but to have that kind of wave action is almost unheard of.

 

I was so worried about Dad’s little car. I remember watching out the window as it lifted up (wheels completely off the ground) and bumped down. I was sure it was going to be destroyed, so I watched over it as best as I could. Surprisingly, the little car made it through the storm with only superficial damage. I always felt like I had helped “save” it.

 

There were several other hurricanes that we prepared for that never did much damage in our area because they changed course. That’s the thing, though, we prepared. So many have actually hit Atlantic coast up to, and including, New Jersey, New York, and much of New England, that I would have thought that they would have been prepared and sensible just like we always were when the threat existed. We always had several days – as did everyone with Sandy.

Hurricane David on FL Coast

The last hurricane that actually occurred in the area in which I was living was Hurricane David in 1979. I was living in Palm Beach County, Florida. My room-mate and I set about strapping up the windows of her four-plex condo as soon as it looked as though the hurricane might actually hit our area. Two or three days before the storm, we got all our shopping done and started boarding up windows. It absolutely DID make it dark inside, but better to be dark than have flying glass, and driving rain inside.

 

Waiting out while a hurricane blows outside can be incredibly boring. Once the power goes (and it’s usually one of the first to shut down), television, radio and all the “normal” activities are out. It’s a smart move to have battery-powered lights so you can read and do crafts. Two other activities that are the norm in a hurricane (at least the ones I can discuss on a “family-friendly” blog – but let me just say that I would imagine the birth-rate skyrockets nine months after a major storm) are sleeping and eating.

 

You can’t open your refrigerator when the power is out because all the cold escapes and goodness only knows when it will come back on. No, cold food is out. We luckily had a gas stove, so we could have hot food. We opened cans of Spaghetti-Os, beanie-weanie, and soup. We, also, had bought a couple of bags of ice just before stores and roads started shutting down, so it was cocktail hour – every hour.

Damage from Sandy
(Businessweek)

I sympathize with all those who are still trying to get their lives back to some sort of order after the storm. I feel especially sorry for those who have – through no fault of their own – lost their homes, businesses, and belongings to the superstorm that Sandy became. No matter how well prepared you are, in some areas there is just going to be loss. No way around it. I applaud all those who are out there doing their best to help.

 

We here at Kalitta Air are having fund raisers in hopes to be able to help some of our coworkers who have been impacted by the storm. There are many organizations that are doing their part. The groups that are out there trying to rescue and help abandoned pets have my particular interest. I’ve donated to several of them. Y’all know what an animal lover I am. Thankfully, there are associations like American Humane Association’s “Red Star,” among others. I was edified to hear that many shelters these days are allowing people who are seeking refuge to bring their WHOLE family – including their pets.

AHA’s Red Star Mobile Rescue & Veterinary Resource

If you are reading this and feel the urge to help out, I hope you will go on line and find a charity that fits your comfort level and ideals. It’s going to take lots of time, people, and donations to combat the effects of this storm.

 

Would you like to subscribe to my blog? (Oh, yes, it’s free!) Hopefully, you have already clicked on the title and are now directly in my blog page. If you have not gotten to the blog page, click on the title of the Posting and it will take you to the blog. From there, follow the WordPress prompts to subscribe. I hope you will. I also hope you will jump in and comment on my posts.

 

Looking forward to “seeing” you here on Colmel’s Blog!