Crazy/Funny Horse Stories

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I recently have been involved in an ongoing thread of posting crazy/funny horse stories on “LinkedIn.” There is a group there called “Horse Lovers of the Business World.” Some of these stories made me laugh so hard! Others brought back funny memories of my own.

I thought I’d share some of these remembrances with you from time to time, and hopefully bring you a smile and/or a chuckle. The first is a true story from my life.

 

Midget

 

Gosh! Where to start? I guess I should get into the “Way back” machine and tell one of the first funny stories from my childhood. When I was about eight years old, I was an aspiring equestrienne. I took saddle-seat lessons from a crusty, old horseman who (I firmly believed) enjoyed watching his students in precarious positions. To this day, I’m sure he put me on Midget as a joke. Midgie was an off-the-track Standardbred trotter. Of course, here I am in my riding class when Ben calls us to trot! Off to the races we went! Midge didn’t have a regular trot in her DNA. So here we are zooming around all the other horses. (I’d pulled her to the inside “passing” lane.) Needless to say, I was posting like a maniac. Up, down, Up, down, Up… you get the picture. I was too young to curse, but I would have been had I known how. All of the sudden, the stallion out in the far pasture starts bellowing. Midge stopped dead in her tracks. She stopped. I didn’t. Off I flew in the most amazing arc. Luckily I was just a little kid, and had been taught that if I was going to fall (and all riders fall), think “sack of oats.” “A sack of oats never broke a bone.” After I picked myself up, I stomped over, grabbed Midget’s bridle, smacked her several times in the legs with my crop, and hauled myself up on her back before anyone could say or do anything. Funny thing, I gained some kind of respect for that from my instructor and I guess even old Midget. She never dumped me again. Oh, and I even got to ride some of the “better” horses for lessons on occasion.

From Sharen: “FLIGHT”

Choosing just one story to share is the hard part. I had purchased my first horse (yes he was beautiful and not what I needed). Montana was a 3 year old Belgian/Morgan cross, green broke, and full of himself. I was a new rider with only a year under my belt. What possessed me I have no idea. After weeks of working with him I was finally able to get off property and hit the trails. We were just coming up to the usual mucky area on the trail when he stopped dead. Head high, ears perked, and getting jumpier by the second. “Okay,” I thought. “This mud spot is going to be more of a challenge than usual.”

Encouraging him forward did not even budge his focus on what was causing this “FLIGHT” response. I knew I had to get him out of it or I was in for a real problem; he is one strong boy. Still thinking it’s the mud, I get real firm and, nope, he would not budge from his fixation. He then starts backing up which in itself is not unusual, but this time he backed into the bush. Now I am getting quite annoyed really mud should not cause this much problems; he is a scardy, cat too. Backed far enough into the bush I am effectively pinned to his back can’t get down to lead him, trees not even allowing me to get much of a kick in.

Then I see it “The Cyclist.” Oh my he hates them scary monsters. The trail is a good distance from the road so really!!!!! He now starts setting back on his haunches like a cat ready to spring on its prey; What the heck is he doing now I wonder.

As the cyclist approaches and goes by, Montana leaps out of the bush at it and gets off a little buck; that I was used to by now. He then starts to prance about and I turn him back up the trail. He went through everything after that with me laughing my head off.

He scared the “Evil Cyclist” off and now demonstrated the confidence to take on anything; mud, deer, dogs, etc.

 

From Mary: “America’s Freedom”

My guy’s name was America. He was a big, old, palomino quarter horse with an appetite for snacks and quite a sense of humor. I call this story America’s freedom!

We heat our home with wood so I get up in the middle of every night to reload the fireplace. I will admit that I do this in a half sleep daze! One night while I was putting wood in I thought that I heard Lady whinnying. I ignored it and finished what I was doing. I headed back to bed and heard it again so I turned on the front porch light and poked my head outside to see the paddock. I saw Lady standing there and everything looked fine so I shutoff the light and closed the door.

Lady starting making all kinds of ruckus so I put on my coat and boots and opened the side door which kicks on the yard light. There stood America in the driveway! I almost had a heart attack. I grabbed a pair of gloves and went out. He knocked over the grain bins and was eating. I looked to see if the gate was open and it was still latched. I opened it and put him back in.

I couldn’t understand how he escaped so I got the quad and started driving around the pasture with a flashlight. Picture the dark of night, in a nightgown, motoring around with a flashlight. At the far back corner the fence was knocked down with deer tracks running through it in the snow. After the deer knocked down the fence America was going to have a midnight snack! Good thing that Lady was so mad that he was out there without her, or else she probably would have never “told” on him! Needless to say all is safe and sound now. I was in a panic when this was all happening but now looking back on it I find it all quite comical.

paloeating

From Joanne: Zip

My Paint gelding, Zip, loves to help around the place. When he was about 2, we were putting up gates and nailing fences, and he grabbed a hammer form the pile and swung it hard enough to hit the post we were nailing on. He was happy as a clam. We laughed and laughed. Then he hit my partner in the kneecap. I bought Zip his own tool caddie and gave him a couple of screwdrivers and a wrench, and he was the happiest subcontractor you’ll ever see. He’s 18 now and owns his own broom for sweeping in front of his stall (a clean aisle is a safe aisle, he always says) and has 22 tricks in his repertoire.

Cleaning Up (Alternate Meaning)

Cleaning Up
(Alternate Meaning)

(I absolutely ADORE this horse and the stories Joanne has told. You would probably enjoy her blog as well! It is www.joannemfriedman.blogspot.com .

 

 

Did this remind you of some funny stories of your own? Please share them with us. They don’t have to be horse stories. If you’ve read my blog over the years, you know anything is fair game – Dogs, horses, cats, husbands (errr… Well, why not?), etc. Just post you story in the comment section below.

 

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Old Friends at Old Friends – The MOST Anticipated Visit

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This is the next-to-last installment about our visit this past summer to “Old Friends – A Kentucky Facility for Retired Thoroughbreds” (www.oldfriendsequine.org ).

 

Those of you who have been following my blog for a while know that we were in the thoroughbred breeding and racing business for a few years. That business brought me some of the highest highs and the lowest lows in my life. Helping with the birth of a foal, getting her through serious illness, and then into the winner’s circle is one of the greatest achievements in my life.

 

Our first mare was Permanent Cut. You’ve heard about her before, and you will again in this and the next post. P.C. was a half-sister to Cut Away, who ran third in the 1982 Preakness. P.C. was a grand-daughter of the great Ribot and her female family was (and still is) one of the top-producing female lines in the country. She was an easy-going girl who I loved, dearly. I hated to part with her; but, unfortunately, the horse business can be very difficult. After some serious financial and emotional set-backs (including losing our first foal – who we had foaled, raised and raced – to colic), it became clear to us that we needed to sell our horses and leave the business. It was a heart-wrenching decision, but a necessary one.

 

Luckily, we had kept our mares with a terrific horseman in Kentucky. He understood our plight and agreed with us that the thoroughbred business had become a losing proposition for us. He helped us find an excellent home for our girls – Permanent Cut and her yearling filly. I was very happy that the new owner kept us apprised of what was going on with the girls. Imagine my joy when I found out that he bred Permanent Cut to a son of Secretariat named Tinners Way.

Tinners Way (photo from Sporthorse)

Tinners Way
(photo from Sporthorse)

Tinners Way had become a favorite of mine the very first time I saw him. I quickly recognized him as being very much like his sire in looks. Secretariat had several sons who had his brilliant chestnut coloring, but most of his sons and daughters that I had met had looked more like their dams (e.g., Lady’s Secret – the brilliant race mare – was gray, Risen Star was virtually black). I had also met Academy Award (better known as “Oscar” – a past/passed Old Friends alum) when Permanent Cut was bred to him at Claiborne farm. “Oscar” had Big Red’s coloring, but he was a slighter/smaller version. Tinners is more like his sire in stature, and – as you can see from photos – in his markings.

Tinners Way (photo from Pintrest)

Tinners Way
(photo from Pintrest)

Tinners Way was a foal of 1990. His sire, and arguably the best horse to ever look through a bridle, had passed away in the previous fall. Tinners was a late foal. Thoroughbred horses become “yearlings” the January 1st following their birthday, no matter what month they happen to be born in. Since Tinners was born in late May (the 25th), he would have been at a great disadvantage racing in the Triple Crown races. His owners/breeders, Juddmonte Farms, instead sent the colt to Europe.

Tinners Way

Tinners Way

In Europe, Tinners only had one start as a 2-year-old. That was a win on the turf. He had four more races in Europe which were all stakes races and in which he won two and came in third in the others. After that, he came to the United States where he ended up in the care of the amazing, Bobby Frankel. Tinners Way won the Pacific Classic (Grade 1) at Del Mar in 1994. In 1995, he won the Pacific Class yet again. Another stand-out race for him in 1995 was a second in a graded stakes race to the great Cigar. His last Grade 1 win was in the Californian at Hollywood Park in 1996. Unfortunately, in his attempt to win back-to-back-to-back runnings of the Pacific Classic, Tinners Way was injured. He was retired to stud.

Tinners Way (photo from maggiemae)

Tinners Way
(photo from maggiemae)

I had been looking forward to meeting Tinners Way since the moment he went to stud in Kentucky. However, that was at the time that we were getting out of the horse business, and my heart just wasn’t in seeing reminders that we were no longer breeding and racing horses. I always hoped, however, that one day I would meet this son of Secretariat that looked so much like his sire. As you will see in an upcoming post, I had been lucky enough to get to know the great, red horse and had visited with him several times. I’d met several of Secretariat’s sons and daughters, but had only found his “spark” sizzling in Lady’s Secret. I wondered if Tinners Way had gotten any of that undefinable quality. I really hoped he had.

Tinner

Tinners Way – SO Handsome

Tinner and Me

Tinner and Me

On August 23 I got the best birthday present ever. I got to spend time at Old Friends with the wonderful people and horses. I had told them about my desire to see Tinners Way (he wasn’t on the regular tour at the time). The staff gave us permission and told us where to find him. It wasn’t far, but there had been so much rain that the way was excessively muddy. I wasn’t to be dissuaded. They also told me that Tinners could be a bit stand-offish. They warned me not to be disappointed if he stood up in the corner of his paddock and didn’t come down to visit. I told them I understood, but still wanted to at least see him from a distance.

My Chat with Tinners Way

My Chat with Tinners Way

They shouldn’t have worried. I called out to Tinners when we were walking up to his paddock. He lifted his head, turned, and started trotting down to the fence. He was wearing a fly mask, but I could see through it that he was, indeed, his father’s son. There was a look of welcome there. Certainly, a large part of his welcome was for someone bringing carrots, but I really felt as though he could tell that I was someone who appreciated him. I immediately got tears in my eyes because his gentleness and self-awareness was much like the way his sire was with me, years ago. He doesn’t have the amazing “presence” Secretariat had – doubt another will – but he did have a calm acceptance that was endearing. I could have stayed there at the fence and talked to him all day. Unfortunately, time to head home came much too soon. I made a promise to myself that I would be back for another visit before too long.

 

Why, Yes, I believe I WILL have a carrot

Why, Yes, I believe I WILL have a carrot

 

One Share in Tinners Way

One Share in Tinners Way

We went back up to the Old Friends office where I immediately bought a “share” in Tinners Way. A share is a $100 donation that helps Old Friends pay for the marvelous upkeep of their horses. Shares are available for all of Old Friends’ wonderful equine guests. I had purchased a share in Bonnie’s Poker a few years back, and intend to make it a yearly donation for Tinners Way. It’s a tangible way to be involved with the horses. Old Friends later sent me a beautiful certificate and photo along with his information page. I also saw that Old Friends had bracelets made from the manes of several of their horses available for purchase. I asked that they call or email me when they had one made from Tinners Way’s mane. I am proud to say that I now have two bracelets.

You Aren't Leaving Are You?

You ARE Going to Give Me That Carrot, Right?

Let me emphasize, again, what an amazing job everyone at Old Friends does. From their beginnings with only a few stallions, Old Friends has grown into the best place on the planet for horses to go when they retire from either the breeding shed (in the case of stallions and mares) or the racetrack (in the case of the geldings). It takes a great deal of money to support all these horses and give them the kind of life they so richly deserve. Old Friends gratefully accepts donations (and they are a tax-deductible charity) and has some terrific items for purchase (some on Ebay) which all go to help the horses. Please check out their website  (www.oldfriendsequine.org ) and see if you, too, might want to be one who helps Old Friends and their tremendous mission.

 

Up Next: Old Friends at Old Friends – A Visit to Great-Grandpa’s Grave

 

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Old Friends at Old Friends – Part 1

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To celebrate my birthday this year, I wanted to go to “Old Friends – A Kentucky Facility for Retired Thoroughbreds”  (http://www.oldfriendsequine.org/). It is one of my favorite places on the planet. Our appointment was for the 10:00 a.m. tour on August 23.

Having been born in Kentucky, and since we were in the thoroughbred breeding and racing business for a number of years, it always concerned me as to what happened to horses after their racing and/or breeding careers were over. This is a situation I am still uneasy about for most horses. One place I am completely at peace with is Old Friends in Georgetown, Kentucky.

 

Bonnie's Poker (Looks Like She'd Enjoyed a Roll!)

Bonnie’s Poker
(Looks Like She’d Enjoyed a Roll!)
Old Friends – Spring 2009

Our first trip to Old Friends was in 2009. My main focus at that time was to see Bonnie’s Poker – the dam (mother) of dual-Classics winner, Silver Charm. Bonnie belonged to Jack Dudley in Florida. Our first mare, Permanent Cut, had belonged to Mr. Dudley, and was purchased through the Ocala Breeders’ sale in January of 1989. She was carrying a Silver Buck foal. I always felt as though Bonnie and P.C. might have known each other.

Let me take a moment to HIGHLY recommend taking a tour of Old Friends! The moment you walk through the office door, you are greeted like a family member – one that people are happy to see. It’s as though you walk into a place where you are totally welcome. It’s hard to appropriately explain the feeling of complete belonging I feel once I arrive at Old Friends. People who have never been there before, or ever even been around horses, report the same feeling of tranquility. It’s almost as though the rush-around world of day-to-day temporarily ceases to exist.

Our group assembled and we headed out to see some of the amazing residents. Not all the horses at Old Friends are former champions – many are. Those who are here are the lucky ones. Someone – or some group – cared enough about these former racers to ensure that their lives after their careers are spent in complete contentment.

You can read all about the residents of Old Friends on their website. I’m going to limit this blog post to my personal memories of the horses we visited.

One of the first residents we met was Gulch, the 1988 Eclipse Award-winning Sprinter.

Gulch Lane's End - 1989

Gulch
Lane’s End – 1989

I had met Gulch many years ago just after he and a superior class of runners had been retired to stud at Lane’s End. Their stallion directory was an amazing “Who’s Who” of recently retired runners (as it still is today). New stallions at the time were Alysheba, Bet Twice, Steinlen, and Gulch. I had grown an immediate attachment to Gulch. Whereas Alysheba was regal, extraordinarily friendly, and spotless, Gulch was irascible and completely covered with mud. Something about his devil-may-care attitude completely captivated me. He’d already proven all he needed to on the track. He would go on to prove himself many times over as an amazingly successful sire.

Alysheba & Me Lane's End - 1989

Alysheba & Me
Lane’s End – 1989

 

Alysheba & Me Lane's End - 1989

Alysheba & Me
Lane’s End – 1989

Gulch Old Friends - August 2013

Gulch
Old Friends – August 2013

 

I had not been back to Old Friends since Gulch was pensioned. I was delighted to see that he really hadn’t changed all that much. He looked fantastic! His flesh and muscle-tone were good. He had aged well. And true to form, he was still largely unimpressed by his visitors, and (as evidenced by his halter) a fan of mud.

Sarava

Sarava
Old Friends – August 2013

  

Sarava Old Friends - August 2013

Sarava
Old Friends – August 2013

Up next was Sarava. I had not previously met Sarava. I remembered him as a huge upset winner of the Belmont Stakes and knew that he was a son of Wild Again (one of the most beautiful stallions I’d ever seen), but had no idea that Sarava was such a beauty!

Bull Inthe Heather

Bull Inthe Heather
Old Friends – August 2013

 

Bull Gets a Carrot

Bull Gets a Carrot
Old Friends – August 2013

Bull Inthe Heather was his normal gregarious self. He stood, not so patiently awaiting his “due” attention and carrots. Bull is a son of the great, much-missed Ferdinand.

I'm Charasmatic

I’m Charasmatic

Another new-to-me resident was I’m Charismatic. This lucky gelding was sired by the beautiful Charismatic who won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes and was saved from certain destruction by the late Chris Antley in the Belmont Stakes. I’ll always remember Chris jumping off Charismatic, his dual-Classics winner, mid-stretch, and cradling his left, front leg and somehow keeping him calm until help could arrive. It is an enduring, indelible image.

I'm Charismatic He Gets a Carrot Too

I’m Charismatic
He Gets a Carrot Too

It seems that I’m Charismatic got lucky, too. Even though he had the bloodlines, I’m Charismatic didn’t have the same trip through life as his sire. I’m Charismatic is a terrific example of the lot of most thoroughbred horses. They are bred to race. When they don’t show the talent to be top racers, they are dropped lower and lower in class. Unlike too many, who are sold to meat buyers from Canada or break down, I’m Charismatic had owners who cared enough to find him a retirement home. He must have been born under a lucky star, because he’s found Heaven on earth. I think he knows this, because he is a completely sweet and affectionate boy.

The last horse I’m going to tell you about in this installment is Ogygion. Ogygion is another stallion I met for the first time many, many years ago. The year was 1987, and this beautiful son of Damascus had just gone to stud at Claiborne Farm in Paris, Kentucky.

Ogygion Old Friends - August 2013

Ogygion
Old Friends – August 2013

After many years in the breeding shed in Kentucky, Ogygion was bought by breeding interests in Japan. When his fertility started declining, Ogygion was sent back to the United States where he was welcomed to his forever home at Old Friends. This (now 31-year-old) boy still is an amazing presence. Like his sire, it seems as though Ogygion has inherited the longevity gene. I was amazed to see him saunter up to the fence to receive his visitors looking many, many years younger than his years.

Ogygion Old Friends - August 2013

Ogygion
Old Friends – August 2013

In my next post, I will share photos and remembrances about many of the other wonderful horses that I was blessed to be able to spend time with at Old Friends in August. Among these are some of my very favorites – Special Ring, Danthebluegrassman, and the late (and much-loved) Sunshine Forever.

I also got to have a very special visit with Tinner’s Way.

Please take a few minutes to visit Old Friends’ website (http://www.oldfriendsequine.org/). I can’t stress strongly enough the amazing work they do and the care they give. Keeping all these wonderful horses properly cared for is no easy feat. It’s also very, very expensive. While the folks at Old Friends usually don’t stress how much money it takes to care for these special creatures, I am more than willing to remind everyone who reads my blog how much it takes. If you are tempted to help, please do! I take no remuneration from my blog or from any source about whom I write. I, usually, don’t request readers to support any cause. I’m making an exception here because I’ve seen, first hand, the fine care given to the horses at Old Friends, and I also know how much it takes to feed, house, and care for just a few horses – let alone over 100.

Would you like to subscribe to my blog? (Oh, yes, it’s free!) Hopefully, you have already clicked on the title and are now directly in my blog page. If you have not gotten to the blog page, click on the title of the Posting and it will take you to the blog. From there, click on “Follow.” I hope you will. You will be notified of each new posting. I also hope you will jump in and comment on my posts.

Looking forward to seeing you here on Colmel’s Blog!

What I Did on My Summer Vacation 2013 (Sharp’s Chapel, TN)

If you’re reading this in email or on Facebook, click on the title! It will take you directly to the blog (an easier viewing page.) If you’re already in my blog, WELCOME! (One more hint: If you click on any of the photos in the blog, they should open up in a browser window so you can get a better look!)

Eagle's Nest Mountain Awaits My Return

Eagle’s Nest Mountain Awaits My Return

Leaving Waynesville (and Eagle’s Nest Mountain) was difficult. We made a promise to ourselves that we would be back soon.

View Toward Norris Lake From Our Property Sharp's Chapel, TN

View Toward Norris Lake
From Our Property
Sharp’s Chapel, TN

From Waynesville, we drove to Sharp’s Chapel, Tennessee. Several years ago, we purchased property in Sharp’s Chapel. We own 29+ acres on a ridge overlooking Norris Lake.

Norris Dam/Lake

Norris Dam/Lake

Norris Lake (Boat Ramp From The HIghlands)

Norris Lake (From The Highlands)

Norris Lake
(From the Boat Ramp)
The Highlands – Sharp’s Chapel, TN

Norris Lake is the product of the first major project for the Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris Dam. The TVA was created in 1933 to control the rampant flooding that had long plagued the Tennessee Valley. Norris Dam held back the Clinch and Powell Rivers, and created Norris Lake.

Entrance to The Highlands Sharp's Chapel, TN

Entrance to The Highlands
Sharp’s Chapel, TN

Our property is in a neighborhood called The Highlands.

Our Dear Friends Enjoying the Rockers Grove Park Inn

Our Dear Friends
Enjoying the Rockers
Grove Park Inn

Our dear friends, the Holcombs (the couple who met us in Asheville) live in The Highlands. That’s where we met. We were happy to see their wonderful old dog, Huckleberry. I’m especially grateful for this time together because Huck went to the Rainbow Bridge not long after we were there. He was a terrific dog!

 Another reason I’m certainly glad that we got to stop and visit for a while was that we got, for the first time, to see what the view from the back of the property looks like. A local developer had purchased and begun to clear, and partition the land on the “back” side of the ridge. (This is the side that faces away from Norris Lake.) We knew the view would be good, but had no idea it would be so special. On a clear day, one can see all the way to Cumberland Gap. Sadly for us, we have put our property on the market. It just isn’t looking like we’ll ever be able to move to Tennessee and build. At least, though, we got to see the vista so we can honestly say that it is gorgeous in all directions. 

View from "Back" Side Our Property Sharp's Chapel, TN

View from “Back” Side
Our Property
Sharp’s Chapel, TN

Panoramic View "Back" Side of Our Property Sharp's Chapel, TN

Panoramic View “Back” Side of Our Property Sharp’s Chapel, TN

Continuation of Panoramic View Our Property Sharp's Chapel, TN

Continuation of Panoramic View
Our Property
Sharp’s Chapel, TN

After too short a visit, we were back on the road heading home. We had one more stop to make – Georgetown, Kentucky. We had one more stop to make. Our appointment was for the next morning, 10:00 a.m. at Old Friends (a Kentucky Retirement Home for Thoroughbred Race Horses)

 

Up Next: What I Did on My Summer Vacation 2013 (Old Friends at Old Friends)

 

Would you like to subscribe to my blog? (Oh, yes, it’s free!) Hopefully, you have already clicked on the title and are now directly in my blog page. If you have not gotten to the blog page, click on the title of the Posting and it will take you to the blog. From there, click on “Follow.” I hope you will. You will be notified of each new posting. I also hope you will jump in and comment on my posts.