WIDMSV – Escanaba (In Da Moonlight?) and Birding the Stonington Peninsula

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We left the Eagle River Inn early to get a good jump on the day. We sure were doing better than the poor soul we saw laying on the beach. Too much of a good thing can sometimes be bad. I guess after all the partying the night before, this guy found himself a nice piece of beach to sleep on. (By the way, we know he wasn’t dead because we saw him roll over to get his face out of the rising sun.)

 

On our way out of the Keweenaw, we made a quick stop to pass on a message from one of my high school mates to an old friend of hers and grab a bite of breakfast. We hadn’t planned to stop again until we reached Escanaba, but we saw this giant ruler and sign on the side of the road and just had to check it out. I mentioned this in my previous post, but just in case you missed it…

 

 

Are you KIDDING me??!!

Are you kidding me??? A record three-hundred-and-ninety-point-four inches of SNOW???? I did the math. That’s over 32-½  feet of snow in one season. As much as I love the Keweenaw, winter there would not be for me (or Jim, either).

Photo courtesy of TripAdvisor

We made good time and arrived in Escanaba right around lunch time. We had read reviews in “TripAdvisor,” and Breezy Point sounded like the place for lunch. As I said in my review on TripAdvisor, it’s a local “dive” bar with a juke box, pool tables, cold beer and really good burgers. Service was slow, but it WAS the day after a holiday and it seems everyone was running a little slow. (Okay, I just have to say it. I’m from the south – y’all know that – and southerners are notoriously dissed for being “slow.” Honey, we ain’t got NOTHING on some of the folks in Escanaba, Michigan.)

Photo from TripAdvisor

If y’all ever decide to go to Escanaba and want to try out the really, good burgers at Breezy Point, I strongly suggest trying to sit outside. The views are really nice. If it hadn’t been record heat, we’d have opted for those tables, too.

 

We headed for our B&B. The Kipling House is actually in Gladstone, Michigan, but it’s close to Escanaba and we are so very glad that we chose this place to stay. As a matter of fact, there’s so much to tell you about this place that I’m giving it a complete post of its own. That will be the next one – the last in the installments of WIDMSV.

 

We set out to explore Escanaba. Most of you won’t have gotten the “In Da Moonlight” reference. Jeff Daniels (yes, THAT Jeff Daniels) is a native son of Chelsea, Michigan. Chelsea is a near-neighbor to where Jim and I live. Jeff Daniels wrote a comedy (play/movie) “Escanaba in Da Moonlight,” about Yooper hunters. He has quite a knowledge of Escanaba because his wife is originally from the town. We were lucky enough to catch Jeff Daniels in his one-man show, and he is absolutely hilarious. What a wit! Anyway, we decided that we needed to check out Escanaba.

 

Escanaba is a nice town. It seems, to me anyway, more like a Lower Peninsula town than others we’ve been to in the UP. Perhaps it’s the close proximity to Wisconsin that makes it “feel” different from the others in the area.

Photo from their website

 For dinner the first night, we went to The Stonehouse (http://www.stonehouseescanaba.com/Home.html ). The restaurant came highly recommended, and we know exactly why. Even though it’s going through some major renovations on the outside, the interior was calm and attractive. Service was friendly, yet professional. I had grouper (my very favorite fish) Panko-breaded topped with lobster and shrimp veloute. Jim had the “great lakes platter” (broiled whitefish and walleye with beer-battered perch. It was a delicious and enjoyable meal. We’d definitely go back.

 

From The Stonehouse website
(callout from me)

After dinner, we drove around Escanaba a little more. We drove down by the marina and found the Delta County Historical Society Lighthouse Museum. It was closed for the day, but we enjoyed walking around and seeing some of the static displays outside…

 

like this giant, wooden rudder

 

and this pile of logs (representative of the millions of board-feet of lumber harvested in the Upper Peninsula and sent to build America).

 

The next day, we went birding on the Stonington Peninsula. We were still in search of the illusive boreal species and this was our last chance this trip. Come to think of it, we didn’t even hear the first loon calling. Now THAT’S disappointing! We birded all along 28 Rd! We got great looks at Red-eyed Vireos (they were everywhere), PeeWees, Red-breasted Nuthatches, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Black-throated Green Warblers, Hermit Thrush, American Redstarts, Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers, Ravens, and a silent empid. Still, no boreal birds, but it seemed everywhere we went, there were deer of all ages, sexes and sizes.

 

From 28 Rd (they have some strange road names up there), we headed down to the boat launch area where there was a gorgeous log home. There we saw an American Bittern, several Common Yellowthroats, Red-winged Blackbirds, and one Black Tern.

 

We continued on to tip of the peninsula. There’s a tower that might be a good spot to look for wading birds, but the flats were conspicuously free of any form of bird. Needless to say, we were pretty disappointed, but we really weren’t there in a good “birding” time of year.

 

 

Escanaba from the Stonington Peninsula

We decided to call it a day. The trip home was coming up and we were hot and tired. It was time to start winding down. We went back to the B&B (remember, a whole post on this next time) to clean up, pack, and get ready for our trip home.

 

We went to Hereford & Hops for dinner. The restaurant is right on the main street in Escanaba. I must say that the beer was really, really good. The food (walleye) was, too, except the service was incredibly (and I do mean INCREDIBLY) slow. It was early on a Friday night and the place was still pretty empty. We really wonder how they manage when it starts getting busy (or if it actually does get busy at all). We even had difficulty getting our beer (and they’re a brew pub).

 

It was a wonderful trip. I have become a huge fan of the UP! I’ve heard my sister-in-law, Kathy, talk about it for years and how much she loves it up there. I knew that I would – for the same reasons, but you can’t imagine how amazingly beautiful it truly is. There are so many areas that we weren’t able to visit (the Porcupine Mountains, especially). We’re already talking about our next trip. I think late spring might be an excellent time (as long as the snow is gone).

 

Up Next: The Kipling House

 

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WIDMSV – The Fourth of July – Keweenaw Style

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WIDMSV? What I Did on My Summer Vacation!

There’s something special about a holiday in a smaller town. It’s especially nice when it’s Independence Day and the weather is sunny and clear. We spent the day in Copper Harbor and the evening at the Eagle River Inn. It was so much fun.

We started the day going for breakfast in Copper Harbor. The place we had intended to eat wasn’t opening for breakfast that day, so we went to another restaurant, The Tamarack Inn. The service was spotty (which is somewhat understandable on a holiday), but we could tell they were trying to please. I had the fritter, French toast. AWESOME! Didn’t think I’d have to eat again for a week, though. We watched the remainder of the parade (which, sadly, we missed most of). What we did see and hear was the fire department with their engines all decked out with flags and bunting, people on bikes, people walking down the street all dressed up in red, white and blue, and others with their dogs in costume. It was a hoot! How, clearly, Americana is that?

 

 

From there, we drove up to the spot where US 41 starts! US 41 is a highway that has been nearby for a large part of my life. I grew up in St. Petersburg, Florida. Not far from there is  where US 41 becomes the ‘famous’ Tamiami (Tampa to Miami) Trail. It also runs through Georgia very near where Jim and I lived for so many years. As you can see from the photo, it runs from the very tip of the Keweenaw all the way to Miami, Florida.

We also got a wonderful surprise while we were taking photos of the sign. A male American Redstart was singing very close by. Before we knew it, he popped into view. Right after that, a Northern Parula started calling from just across the road. We waited and, sure enough, he flew right overhead and continued singing. I guess it’s never too late to look for ‘love’ in the Keweenaw.

 

From there, we headed back south (well, honestly, there isn’t much further north we could go without being in Lake Superior). We stopped at an outlook where the Eagle River flows into the Lake. Such a beautiful spot!

 

There were some really gorgeous flowers growing right by the river. I just had to take a photo. Then we walked out onto the rocks and saw some spectacular lake views.

 

  

Walking back up to the car, we saw this male American Redstart singing away. He was right over head and didn’t move when I focused my camera on him.

 

Then we headed to Studio 41 (http://www.studio41copper.com ).

 

What a fabulous place! It was hard not to buy everything in the shop – well, except for the price tags. Thing is, they represent several local artists as well as the works of the owners.

One of the items we bought was this gorgeous copper bracelet. The photo really doesn’t do it justice, and my almost constant wearing has dulled the shine to a lovely patina.

Another purchase are these fabulous maple leaves! They have these sculptures in many sizes, but this spray is just perfect for the location on one of our smaller living room walls.

 

After that, it was off to The Berry Patch once again. We enjoyed our ice cream so much the day before, we just had to go back. Of course, there’s something intrinsically American about ice cream on the 4th of July. In honor of George Washington (well, not REALLY), I had the tart cherry sundae. What a treat! The sweet, smooth, velvety vanilla ice cream with the tart cherry preserves… HEAVENLY! And, here, I’d thought I wouldn’t have room after breakfast. I guess it must have been all that walking in the fresh air.

 

We took the drive along the Lake Superior shoreline. This is such a gorgeous drive. The day was clear and, once again, the lake was flat and calm. I would love to have the time to paint all the beautiful views.

We stopped along the way at yet another lighthouse. This was in Eagle Harbor. They had built an observation deck with these informational plaques.  I thought they were very interesting.

 

 

Just where the road curls away from the shoreline you come to The Jam Pot (http://www.societystjohn.com/store/ ). They are a Catholic Monastery of the Byzantine rite. The monastery bakes amazing breads, cakes and cookies, but we were there for the jam. What jam it is! They have so many varieties that it is virtually impossible to list them all, but we made sure that we bought bilberry and thimbleberry. They also have a full line of sugar-free jam.

  

Right next to The Jam Pot is Jacob’s Creek Falls. It’s so nice to find such a pretty waterfall so easily accessible. Even though it had been a drier than usual summer, the falls had plenty of water and it was so nice to enjoy the cool air and listen to the sound of falling water on rocks.

 

Once back at the Eagle River Inn (http://www.eagleriverinn.com/ ) we dropped off our purchases and headed down for the barbecue. That smoker that they built sure puts out some delicious que! A great pulled pork sandwich and a beer? That says Independence Day to me! We headed out to the beach to stand in the water and enjoy the company of new friends. There were a couple with their parents from Minnesota there. They also had two of the funniest, most friendly dogs (a Weimaraner and a German Shorthaired Pointer). We had a grand time visiting with both humans and canines.

A group of children came down the beach with their own version of a Lakes freighter. Interestingly enough, there was the life-sized version out on the lake at the same time.

We were really enjoying our evening waiting for the band to set up and the fireworks that would begin around 11 p.m. That was until a big storm blew up! There was a small boat that had come to anchor off the Inn to enjoy the band and the fireworks, but he had to head off in a hurry to beat the oncoming rain and wind. Mother Nature had her own fireworks in store for us! I thought the tent that had been set up for the band was going to end up in Wisconsin, but some brave souls held on until the storm eventually passed. By this time, we were up in our room and had decided to call it a night. We figured that they’d have to wait until another night for the fireworks and we were leaving in the morning.

 

We should have had more faith in the hardiness of the partiers. Sure enough, around midnight, the storm had cleared out and the fireworks were set up. The band had not stayed, but they had radio so the party continued and the fireworks went off. We really had an excellent view from our room as we faced the beach.

I was a little sad that we weren’t staying longer in the Keweenaw. I know that we will definitely come back. We will absolutely make reservations at The Eagle River Inn, and – this time – we’ll be able to bring our “kids!” One thing I can pretty well assure you of, is that we won’t be doing our travel to the Keweenaw in the winter. We saw this marker on our way south.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Up Next: Escanaba (In Da Moonlight?) and Kipling

 

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WIDMSV – Eagle River Inn; Brockway Mountain Drive; Visiting an Old Friend’s Family

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WIDMSV? What I Did on My Summer Vacation!

 

We reached the upper parts of the Keweenaw Peninsula expecting cooler weather. Unfortunately, the ‘weather gods’ didn’t get the memo. It was in the mid-90s! Again, it’s not SUPPOSED to be that hot in the Keweenaw. For the most part, they don’t have air-conditioning. They usually don’t need it. Phew!

Eagle River Inn (Beach side)
Photo from their Website

Representative Room
Eagle River Inn

We checked into our room at the Eagle River Inn (which was so clean and newly refurbished, we could still smell the fresh paint). The Eagle River Inn has been a labor of love for Mike and Marc (the proprietors). They have spent every penny they could come up with on fixing up this wonderful inn which is only steps away from one of the prettiest, most accessible beaches in the Keweenaw. Their attention to detail is amazing. They have turned this location into a comfortable, friendly, destination inn that we will look forward to visiting over and over again.

One of our “neighbors”

 

Did I mention that the Eagle River Inn is DOG FRIENDLY??!!!! They are! I believe that the future of inn-keeping is in pet-friendly accommodations. More and more, people consider their pets integral parts of the family. The idea of leaving a family member behind in a kennel or alone at home is troubling. A key to enjoying a family vacation is for the WHOLE family to enjoy the time together. I really have to commend The Eagle River Inn for being so forward thinking.

 

It was far more comfortable driving in the car – with air-conditioning –so we decided that the Brockway Mountain Drive sounded like a good idea. The drive is a beautifully scenic road that runs from just north of Eagle River up to Copper Harbor. The views winding up the road are just beautiful. There are views of Lake Superior

 

Inland lakes

 

 Valleys

 

 Rock outcroppings

 

I have read that there were plan to put a cell tower on Brockway Mountain. (Okay, y’all, this wouldn’t be considered a “mountain” in the south – well, except maybe Florida. In Michigan, however, this is surely a “mountain” as the glaciers really scraped most of the state flat.) It is the highest point around and I understand the need for communications, but I certainly hope that they figure something else out that won’t mar the beauty of this amazingly pristine area.

 

Wild Berry
(World’s Best Ice Cream!)

As we reached the end of the road, we found ourselves just a little ways from the Wild Berry. I had found out that one of my high school classmates had grown up in Copper Harbor, Michigan. She and her family (the Nousiainens) had owned and run the Wild Berry Ice Cream store. Her brother, George (who had been a few years ahead of us in school), had moved back to Copper Harbor and was still running the store.

 

ICE CREAM!!!!! What a marvelous idea! It was especially welcome in this heat. We would have loved to visit more with George and his wife, but we weren’t the only ones thinking that ice cream sounded like a good idea. The place was packed! We did, however, get the opportunity to treat ourselves to sundaes made with local fruit and some of the best, smoothest, most delicious ice cream I’ve ever eaten. (In retrospect, I wonder if the ice cream was really as fabulous as I remember or if it was just because it was so very welcome.)

Thimbleberry

 

I opted for thimbleberry. A thimbleberry is related to raspberries. It’s a delicious, tart fruit with LOTS (and I do mean to capitalize that) of seeds! It’s absolutely delicious, but the pips… I tend to think they’re worth dealing with.

 

Bilberry

Jim opted for bilberry. Bilberries are related to what we call blueberries. In fact, in Europe, these are what they know as blueberries. This special variety only grows in the Keweenaw and especially in the wilds around Copper Harbor. Bilberry is known to be good for maintaining healthy blood-sugar levels and the leaves make a tea that is good for blood pressure. I guess that means that Jim was eating “health food.” Yeah, uh huh…

 

All I can tell you is that we both thoroughly enjoyed our sundaes, and it was great to be able to visit with family of an old friend. We immediately made plans to come back the next day for more camaraderie and, of course, more ice cream.

 

By the time we finished our ice cream and said good-bye, we were getting pretty worn out. It had been a very long day starting with birding (and getting eaten alive) in the morning and lots of driving in the middle. We decided to head back to the Eagle River Inn, grab some dinner, and try to get some sleep.

 

The road that we took back south followed the shoreline of Lake Superior. What a gorgeous place this is! We stopped at a couple of outlooks along the way. At one, there was a couple who were tossing a ‘duck’ out into the Lake for their chocolate lab to fetch. We enjoyed watching the dog swim out again and again (obviously enjoying his game), retrieving his prize, and returning it to his people.

 

We wanted to make certain that we got back to Fitzgerald’s (the superb restaurant at the Eagle River Inn) for our dinner reservation. The special was smoked prime rib! They have a huge smoker in the parking lot of the Inn. It smelled so wonderful when we left that we wanted to be sure not to miss out.

Fitzgerald’s
(Photo from their Website)

We were rewarded handsomely! That was one of the finest meals we’ve had in a while. The meat was smoked to perfection and the accompaniments were excellent. Jim had a smoked-fish appetizer. I tried it, but I decided that I’d save the room for dinner. I did, however, have a nice ‘Bookers.’ I must make a special note of the tremendous variety of whiskies that Fitzgerald’s stocks. Whether it’s bourbon or scotch whiskey that float your boat, they probably have your brand – or a brand that you’ve been wanting to try. They also have an excellent selection of whiskies from other parts of the world (Canadian, Irish, even Japanese).

Sunset at
The Eagle River Inn

 

After eating a huge meal, and the long day, we were ready for a good night’s sleep. This was the first time it really occurred to me that we were much further north. At 11:00 p.m., it was still light (and still HOT)! After snapping several photos of the amazing sunset and a late lakes’ freighter, I finally drifted off to sleep. Tomorrow is the Fourth of July! I figured I wouldn’t be getting much sleep at all then.

Lakes Freighter

 

Up Next: The Fourth of July – Keweenaw Style

 

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WIDMSV – Visiting Houghton and The Eagle Has Landed

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WIDMSV? What I Did on My Summer Vacation!

 

After spending a couple of hours birding the Pesheekee Grade, we were ready to eat. There really isn’t any place to eat breakfast in the Michigamme area that we could find, so we headed on to Houghton. As much as I would have loved to visit the KBC brewery, it really wasn’t a prudent place to consider for breakfast.

 

The first restaurant we attempted to go to had been highly rated, but we opted out after a really poor experience. I am not going to name the establishment in my blog, because my southern heritage always taught me that, if I couldn’t say something nice – say nothing at all. Besides, even mentioning it here is giving it more attention than they gave us.

The Library Restaurant and Brew Pub

 

Luckily for us, we found The Library Restaurant and Brew Pub (http://www.librarybrewpub.com). It wasn’t quite time to start serving lunch yet (it was just around 11 a.m.), but we were courteously seated and given water and menus. Our server, Brian, was very nice and made us feel quite welcome. We opted for lunch and were very pleasantly surprised. I had the shrimp po boy and Jim had a combination sandwich. It was roast beef, cheddar cheese, and a BLT all rolled into one. He loved it. The experience was completely pleasant and the food was superb. They also are one of the innovators and first to use the new bill-paying service called “Tabbed Out.” What a smart idea that is! I hope more restaurants start using it soon. (Automatically pays your tab with your chosen credit card without having to wait for the check. It also computes tip and pays the establishment without passing your credit card around. BRILLIANT!)

Keweenaw Gems & Gifts
(Photo courtesy of Keweenaw Gems & Gifts)

We felt so much better after a good meal that we decided to stop at Keweenaw Gems and Gifts (http://www.copperconnection.com/) to see what kind of wonderful stone and metal arts we could find. What a ‘dangerous’ store. There were so many wonderful treasures, we had to really narrow down our focus. Once again, we could have totally blown our budget. We did make a couple of purchases. One was this lovely polished Petoskey Stone (Michigan’s State Stone) clock for Jim’s desk at work.

Petoskey Stone Clock

I just have to mention Lily, the Labradoodle. Lily comes to the store with her people. She’s the ‘official’ watch dog. Once she actually meets you, she’s a terrific ‘hostess.’ What a fantastic dog!

Lily
(Photo courtesy of Keweenaw Gems & Gifts)

We also purchased some gifts for friends. I just LOVE getting my Christmas shopping done before the Fourth of July!

Look at all the Treasure!
(Photo courtesy of Keweenaw Gems & Gifts)

From Houghton, it was on to Eagle River. Eagle River is on the western coast of the Keweenaw peninsula. Our destination was the Eagle River Inn http://www.eagleriverinn.com/. We had read interesting reviews of the inn and I had written to the new owners and was very favorably impressed by their positive attitudes and their obvious desire to provide a terrific experience for their guests.

Marc & Mike (Proprietors, Eagle River Inn)
(Photo by Shawn Malone)

The Eagle River Inn is right on the beach. It’s only a few steps from the deck to the water. It’s especially nice because the beach there is nice, stone sand and the water is clear and the bottom is that same sand. Many places on the lake are rocky which makes it difficult to get to the water. It’s even harder when the rocks are covered with vegetation. (I wonder if we noticed more of that due to the extraordinarily hot weather or if it’s a symptom of invasive, non-native vegetation I’ve been reading about.) I will be writing more about the Inn (and their terrific restaurant, Fitzgerald’s) in coming posts. I’ll say right now, though, that I wish we’d scheduled more than two nights at the Inn. Here’s a photo of a sunset we saw our first night. The sunsets there are so breath-taking, you’ll undoubtedly see more photos of them in coming posts.

Sunset – First Night
Eagle River Inn

Up Next: Eagle River Inn and Brockway Mountain Drive

 

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WIDMSV – Birding in Michigamme

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WIDMSV? What I Did on My Summer Vacation!

 

I had been really looking forward to birding the Pesheekee Grade! (To you non-birders out there, this is a road near Michigamme, Michigan that is known for great birding.) We were really hoping that we would finally get our two “target birds” (Boreal Chickadee and Gray Jay) here. What I did get was a new appreciation for black flies! (Hint: They draw blood and leave marks!)

Gray Jay

 

We left the Bed &  Breakfast without the ‘Breakfast’ part so that we could arrive at the Pesheekee Grade early enough to find some really terrific birds. There are all kinds of habitat along this road. There are areas of dense conifers, open grasslands, and bogs. Again, there were several large mixed flocks in which there was at least one ‘possible’ Boreal Chickadee. I’m not one to claim a bird unless I’m sure, so it stays off my life-list until I know for certain.

Boreal Chickadee

 

By far, the most common bird for the entire trip was Red-breasted Nuthatch. They seemed to be everywhere! We heard them at virtually every stop. The next three most-common species were Red-Eyed Vireo (surprisingly good looks at a usually concealed bird), American Redstart and Yellow-rumped Warbler. It was wonderful to see and hear so many warbler species this time of year. We in the Lower Peninsula get to see these gorgeous birds during Spring migration and then again in the fall (with their more muted plumages). In the UP, they were all in their spiffy-best feathers. Among other birds seen and heard at Pesheekee were Veery, Hermit Thrush, Wood Thrush, Rusty Blackbirds, Northern Parula, Palm Warblers, and Common Ravens. There were numerous House Wrens, Blue Jays, and many Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers. I was somewhat surprised by the lack of Northern Cardinals.

 

Red-breasted Nuthatch

We also met a gentleman who was out walking his dogs. It was a little disconcerting to note that he had a holster with one BIG gun. (It was a 45 like Dirty Harry’s!) That was a reminder that you can never be off your guard as there are all kinds of critters out there. The area is known for moose – although we didn’t see any. I know that there are also bears and coyotes. We did see quite a few deer while there, as well. I would definitely like to go back to this road earlier in the day and at a time of year that would be more likely to find more boreal species. I would be remiss, though, if I didn’t note how rough the road is. It’s paved (after a fashion), but it’s got more rills and dips than a roller coaster. It could definitely could use major work!

 

Up Next: Visiting Houghton and The Eagle Has Landed

 

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WIDMSV – Munising: Muldoon’s & Open Wings; Marquette: Irish Rover

If you’re reading this in email or on Facebook, click on the title! It will take you directly to the blog (an easier viewing page.) If you’re already in my blog, WELCOME! (One more hint: If you click on any of the photos in the blog, they should open up in a browser window so you can get a better look!)

 

WIDMSV? What I Did on My Summer Vacation!

 

So, when we left you last, we’d just come off the Shipwreck Cruise. Now we are starving! We’d been reading that Muldoon’s Pasties perennially wins all competitions for the best pasties in the UP. It was time for us to find out for ourselves.

 

Okay, so I hear my southern brethren asking, “What the heck is she talking about? Pasties?” No, y’all, not the twirly things that exotic dancers wear. These are delectable edibles. The best description I can give is that it’s like a hand-held pot pie. I believe they originated in the British Isles. Back in the day, miners didn’t get much time for lunch/dinner. So the women came up with a way to bake meat and root vegetables into a sturdy, sealed crust. The “Cornish” pasty was born. When a whole bunch of miners emigrated to the UP to mine copper and iron, they brought their pasties and recipes with them. Today, they are basically the same as they’ve always been, except they are usually served with gravy or ketchup, and mostly they are eaten with utensils. See the photos below.

 

Pasty

 

Pasty with Gravy

 

In our opinion, all those awards given to Muldoon’s were absolutely correct. They are the best I’ve ever had outside of home-cooked. They are very, very filling. Unless you have a huge appetite, it’s probably best to split one between two people. The gravy was delicious, too. Muldoon’s makes beef (which we had), chicken, vegetarian, cherry and apple pasties. The cherry and apple seem to us to be a northern translation of what we (down south) call fried pies. Wish we’d had room to try them, but as I said, those beef ones are mighty filling. I guess we’ll have to wait for our next trip to Munising to try the fruit-filled ones.

 

On our way back to Marquette, we stopped at Open Wings Pottery. What a remarkable place! They actually throw the pots there (and it was SO hot – I can’t imagine trying to work with clay and firing up kilns). Their work was amazing! They also feature art from many different media (jewelry, textiles, and other potters’ works). I could have spent hours and loads of cash in their shop. As it was, we ended up purchasing the necklace below (it’s Lake Superior Jasper and Greenstone)

 

 

 

and the cool luminary/utensil holder (I haven’t decided which I will use it for yet) with the outline of the UP.

 

It was a full day, and we were completely exhausted. We decided to stay right in Marquette for supper. After the huge pasty from Muldoon’s, I really wasn’t very hungry for supper. A nice, cold beer is what I had in mind. So we decided to head to The Wild Rover (http://wildrovermqt.com) . I knew that a pub was the best place to unwind and end the day. I opted for a Black & Tan and stuffed potato skins. Jim chose a KBC (Keweenaw Brewing Company – www.keweenawbrewing.com) Blonde and fish & chips. Our waiter was very attentive without being overbearing. Again, we decided to split a dessert. We ended our meal with an incredible molten lava cake with raspberry coulis. (If you know me, you know I’m a complete sucker for anything raspberry!)

 

We headed back to Blueberry Ridge and prepared to end our stay. The next destination was one I had been anxiously awaiting – the Keweenaw Peninsula.

 

Up Next: Birding in Michigamme and Visiting Houghton

 

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WIDMSV – Munising: Miners’ Castle and Shipwreck Tour

If you’re reading this in email or on Facebook, click on the title! It will take you directly to the blog (an easier viewing page.) If you’re already in my blog, WELCOME! (One more hint: If you click on any of the photos in the blog, they should open up in a browser window so you can get a better look!)

 

WIDMSV? What I Did on My Summer Vacation!

 

 

After the long, hot and ambitious day we had on Day 2 of our vacation (Birding, Big Bay, and Gwinn), one would think we would just sit back and relax. Not a chance! Hey, we only get to do this once a year – if we’re lucky. After another blueberry breakfast (Finnish pancakes with blueberry sauce and blueberry buckle; but, still, no meat), off to Munising we went.

One of the Formations
Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

 

Munising is east of Marquette and is famous for its Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore (http://www.nps.gov/piro/index.htm). A few years ago, we went on a Pictured Rocks cruise. I have to say that this is one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever seen. The water in Lake Superior is so clear that it is possible to see as far down as 100 feet in some places. The national lakeshore has been scrupulously kept pristine and, for that, we should all be grateful. No t-shirt shops or hot dog stands mar the incredible natural beauty. If we had more time available, we’d absolutely go on that cruise again.

Great Lakes
Superior – darker color

 

For all y’all who have never actually seen the Great Lakes, I have to give you some information about Lake Superior. Before I saw the Great Lakes for the first time, I had no point of reference. My idea of a big lake is Lanier in Georgia. I grew up in Florida, so had always heard about Lake Okeechobee. I did actually drive around part of Okeechobee, but you don’t get visuals like you do the Great Lakes. The only thing I can equate looking out on one of the Great Lakes – especially Superior – is looking at the Gulf of Mexico or the ocean. You absolutely can NOT see the other side. They are so vast! Nothing really could prepare me for experiencing the Great Lakes and I am still stunned every time I see them.

Lake Superior
(NASA photo from Space)

 

For some terrific facts on Lake Superior, I’m attaching the following link: http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/superior/superiorfacts.html

 

Some of my favorite points from this website are:

 

  • Lake Superior is, by surface area, the world’s largest freshwater lake.
  • The surface area of Lake Superior (31,700 square miles or 82,170 square kilometers) is greater than the combined areas of Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New Hampshire.
  • The Lake Superior shoreline, if straightened out, could connect Duluth and the Bahama Islands.
  • Lake Superior contains as much water as all the other Great Lakes combined, even throwing in two extra Lake Eries.
  • Lake Superior contains 10% of all the earth’s fresh surface water.
  • There is enough water in Lake Superior (3,000,000,000,000,000 — or 3 quadrillion — gallons) to flood all of North and South America to a depth of one foot.
  • The deepest point in Lake Superior (about 40 miles north of Munising, Michigan) is 1,300 feet (400 meters) below the surface.

    Miner’s Castle

 

We had made reservations to take a shipwreck tour, but arrived too early. We decided to take a side-trip to Miner’s Castle. We’d seen the formation from the Pictured Rocks Tour, but it is also accessible from the land side. While Jim walked out to get a closer look, I stayed around the parking lot because it was full of American Redstarts. I tried to be as unobtrusive as possible and it sure paid off as I watched a female American Redstart gleaning bugs and take them into her nest. That was a first for me. I also got a charge out of watching her mate chase off every other bird who dared to come into their domain.

Lake Superior
Miner’s Castle in foreground

 

As I was watching the birds, a family (mom, dad and young son) came up and asked if I was birding. When I assured them that I was and that I didn’t at all mind answering questions (if I was able), they told me that they were from California and that their son was very interested in birds. I showed him the area to watch and he was thrilled to watch the female redstart going in and out of her hidden nest. Those moments, watching young people react to birds, are the best!

Female Redstart

 

Off to the docks we went. We have been so lucky, and our luck held! Both times we have planned and gone on boat rides on Superior, it’s been flat calm. I know y’all read my posts about The Edmund Fitzgerald (right?). Superior can be one angry, scary gal when she wants to be. For us, she’s been quite the lady.

 

We got down to the dock and boarded our glass-bottomed boat (http://shipwrecktours.com/) to three shipwrecks – the Bermuda, the Herman H. Hettler, and a French, Scow-Schooner that is, at present, un-identified (although it may be more than 400 years old, having been used in the fur trade) We also got the opportunity to go past the East Channel Lighthouse, both on the way out and back. The boat was quite full, but the tour operators were professional and made certain that everyone got an opportunity to see each of the shipwrecks. I knew that the waters of Superior were clean and clear, but this trip really brought that fact home. Although some of the ships were in 20+ feet of water, it was really easy to see the wreckage and make out boards, planks, fixtures (including a captain’s bathtub), passageways, and wheels.

Wreck of the Herman H. Hettler

 

I’m glad that we took the trip! It was definitely worth the time. If, however, you are only able to take one trip from Munising (either Pictured Rocks or Shipwreck), I’d strongly suggest that you opt for the Pictured Rocks cruise. As I said before, I’d definitely do that again!

Wreckage of the Bermuda

 

Anchor of Herman H. Hettler

East Channel Lighthouse

 

Up Next: WIDMSV – Munising: Muldoon’s & Open Wings; Marquette: Irish Rover

 

Would you like to subscribe to my blog? (Oh, yes, it’s free!) Hopefully, you have already clicked on the title and are now directly in my blog page. If you have not gotten to the blog page, click on the title of the Posting and it will take you to the blog. That’s okay, we’ll wait! At the top of the blog, you should see a button with “Follow” next to it. If you click that button, a checkmark should show up. At that point, you should be subscribed. (WordPress is one of the easiest blogs to work with, and I’m still frequently befuddled with how it works!)

Looking forward to “seeing” you here on Colmel’s Blog!